Category: eesdx


Child benefit cuts hit more


first_imgWednesday 20 October 2010 8:07 pm Read This NextThe Truth About Bottled Water – Get the Facts on Drinking Bottled WaterGayotRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe WrapNewsmax Rejected Matt Gaetz When Congressman ‘Reached Out’ for a JobThe Wrap2 HFPA Members Resign Citing a Culture of ‘Corruption and Verbal Abuse’The Wrap whatsapp whatsapp KCS-content Show Comments ▼ THE withdrawal of child benefit from higher rate taxpayers in 2013 will hit 300,000 families more than the government had first believed, it emerged yesterday. Chancellor George Osborne said child benefit would remain in place until young people left education “at the age of 18 or even 19” rather than being reduced from 19 to 16.Government officials now said the lower figure had been a “cautious” initial estimate and had not been vetted by the Office of Budget Responsibility.The change means 1.5m families, rather than 1.2m as previously suggested, will lose the benefit.Officials said the lower figure had been a “cautious” estimate and did not take into account those families that would have lost the benefit had the age limit been reduced. The controversial plans, which see those earning more than £43,875 lose the entitlement, would also raise more than double the £1bn annual savings the government had first forecast, to £2.5bn a year, Osborne said. The proposals have been a constant headache for the coalition since they were announced at the Conservative party conference at the beginning of this month. Shortly after the proposals were announced it emerged single income families on more than £43,875 would lose child benefit, while a family in which both parents worked but earned £40,000 each, giving a combined income of £80,000, would still receive the benefit. Labour shadow chancellor Alan Johnson, attacked Osborne over the figures saying: “The discrepancy between previous projections and what the chancellor announced today beggars belief.” Tags: NULL Child benefit cuts hit more Sharelast_img read more


Prestige Assurance Plc (PRESTI.ng) Q12015 Interim Report


first_imgPrestige Assurance Plc (PRESTI.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2015 interim results for the first quarter.For more information about Prestige Assurance Plc (PRESTI.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Prestige Assurance Plc (PRESTI.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Prestige Assurance Plc (PRESTI.ng)  2015 interim results for the first quarter.Company ProfilePrestige Assurance Plc is an insurance company in Nigeria licensed to cover all classes on non-life insurance. The company offers products for motor, marine, bond, engineering, fire, aviation, oil and gas, and general insurance. Prestige Assurance Plc also provides all risk insurance and products for group personal accident, burglary, fidelity guarantee, workmen’s compensation, machinery breakdown, fire and allied perils, consequential loss insurance and liability insurance. Prestige Assurance Plc is a subsidiary of The New India Assurance Company Limited, Mumbai. It was founded in 1952. The company’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Prestige Assurance Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more


Rugby Rant: Residency rule needs tightening up


first_imgThat’s not a Scot! Sean Maitland flew from New Zealand straight into the Scotland – and Lions – teamsBy Sarah Mockford THE SRU have generated negative headlines recently with their ‘project players’ – and I have to agree with them.Bringing players over from South Africa – or elsewhere – with a view to them qualifying to represent Scotland after the three-year residency period leaves a bitter taste. It devalues the international jersey and does nothing to inspire young Scottish players.As an aspiring player, toiling away week in, week out as you strive to don national colours, it must be so disenchanting to see the union looking overseas, denying them a chance to fill that jersey.The move also smacks of an inferiority complex. The home nations should back their own talent and not put a player on a pedestal simply because he’s from New Zealand or South Africa.So what’s the solution? I’d extend the residency qualification from three years to five. That way players have to show a real commitment to their chosen country and it will stop older southern hemisphere players heading north in their late twenties having failed to make a Tri-Nations squad, thinking they’ll find it easier to be selected for Test rugby on this side of the world. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS At the moment, players can strive to make the World Cup squad of one country, then move abroad to qualify for another in time for the next tournament.Secondly, I think playing for a country’s U20 team or any senior side should automatically tie you to that country.This creates a standardised system that prevents the confusion generated by last year’s Steve Shingler case. He couldn’t represent Scotland because Wales had designated their U20s side – for which Shingler had played – as their ‘second team’. He clearly hadn’t understood those ramifications.Many fans question how the likes of Thomas Waldrom and Brad Barritt can play for England after representing NZ Maori and the Emerging Boks respectively. By drawing a clear line from the U20s upwards, the policy is far more consistent.center_img Playing Test rugby is an honour and a privilege – having players switch allegiances willy-nilly tarnishes that idea. Yes, rugby’s a professional sport, but we should cherish the traditional values of pride and passion, especially at the highest level.This was published in the February 2013 edition of Rugby World. Click here to find out what’s in the current issue.last_img read more


World Refugee Day resources available for congregations, dioceses


first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] June 20 is World Refugee Day and the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society has prepared resources to observe this important event in dioceses and congregations of all sizes.“In observance of World Refugee Day, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society invites Episcopalians to learn more about how The Episcopal Church welcomes and resettles refugees in partnership with our 30 resettlement affiliates in 26 dioceses across the country,” commented Bishop Stacy Sauls, Chief Operating Officer of The Episcopal Church.“World Refugee Day was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 2000 to honor the contributions of refugees throughout the world and to raise awareness about the growing refugee crisis in places like Syria and Central Africa,” said Deborah Stein, Director of Episcopal Migration Ministries for the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.  “World Refugee Day is especially significant this year as the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society continues to celebrate its 75th year of this life-saving ministry.”ResourcesTo support local World Refugee Day celebrations, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society has created several tools:•    Worship materials for Sunday, June 21 (the closest Sunday to World Refugee Day) including prayers of the people and sermon starters, that can be downloaded at no fee here.•    Bulletin insert for Sunday, June 21 (the closest Sunday to World Refugee Day) which focuses on bringing awareness to refugee issues and opportunities for local involvement in this life-saving ministry. Insert can be downloaded at no fee here.•    An interactive map of events across The Episcopal Church to find a World Refugee Day event that is convenient to your community. Interactive map is here.•    Information about where to find an Episcopal Migration Ministries affiliate in your community and how you can volunteer locally can be found here.  If you are interested in learning more about partnership opportunities, contact Allison Duvall, Manager for Church Relations and Engagement ([email protected])•    #ShareTheJourney with Episcopal Migration Ministries by hosting a World Refugee Day event in your congregation or diocese. Send your event details to [email protected] to be included in the World Refugee Day interactive map.Did you know?The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reports:•    Every four seconds someone is forced to flee due to conflict, persecution or fear of violence.•    There are currently more than 50 million refugees, asylum seekers, and internally displaced people worldwide, the most in the post-World War II era.•    To date, more than 3 million Syrians have fled the violence in their country.Resettlement facts from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society:•    70,000 refugees were resettled in the U.S. in 2014.•    5,155 refugees were resettled in 2014 by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society and its network of affiliate officesQuestions? Allison Duvall, Manager for Church Relations and Engagement for Episcopal Migration Ministries, at [email protected], 212-716-6000.Episcopal Migration MinistriesEpiscopal Migration Ministries is the refugee resettlement program of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society. Each year the Missionary Society works in partnership with its affiliate network, along with dioceses, faith communities and volunteers, to welcome refugees from conflict zones across the globe.#ShareTheJourney as the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society celebrates 75 years of resettling refugees in the United States. #ShareTheJourney is a multi-media effort to educate, form, and equip Episcopalians to engage in loving service with resettled refugees and to become prophetic witnesses and advocates on behalf of refugees, asylees, migrants, and displaced persons throughout the world.Check out the website: www.episcopalchurch.org/emm and www.episcopalchurch.org/sharethejourney Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA World Refugee Day Leigh Foster says: June 3, 2015 at 3:40 am I am impressed with all the great work you are doing to support refugees in the US! If you would like to support World Refugee Day this year on a global level- we would love your support!Please see http://www.refugeeday.orgfor videos, stories and click on “get involved” for great social media content. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Refugees Migration & Resettlement, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Posted May 28, 2015 Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York World Refugee Day resources available for congregations, dioceses From Episcopal Migration Ministries Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 28, 2015 at 4:44 pm Under the “Did you know?” category, mention might be made of the 4.7 million Palestinian refugees. Prevented by the Israeli Government from returning to their homes in the Holy Land, they are the longest extant refugee population in the world. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, center_img Comments are closed. Vicki Gray says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (2) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more


World Council of Churches ‘gravely concerned’ over Israel’s travel ban


first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Israel-Palestine, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI March 11, 2017 at 8:40 am Its about time to stop those fake Christians and fake humanitarians that spread Anti-Semitism and danage the good relations between Israeli Christians and Jews. Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [World Council of Churches] The World Council of Churches March 9 expressed grave concern about a new law passed March 8 by the Knesset which reportedly forbids granting entry visas to foreign nationals who call for economic, cultural or academic boycotts of either Israel or the Israeli settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories. The ‘Entry to Israel Act (Denial of Visa to Non-Residents Who Knowingly Call for a Boycott on Israel)’ apparently makes no distinction between boycotting Israel proper and boycotting products of the settlements, which are widely considered illegal under international law.“If reports of its content and intent are correct, this law is a shockingly regressive law,” said WCC General Secretary Rev. Olav Fykse Tveit. “It would be a clear violation of freedom of expression, that is critical for those who want to visit Israel, for those who have to live under the occupation, and for those who want access to the Palestinian territories. It is also a significant violation of freedom of religion. It is precisely because of our Christian principles and teachings that we in the World Council of Churches find the purchase and consumption of goods produced in Israeli settlements in the occupied territories immoral, and it is for the same reason many churches and Christians around the world choose to divest from companies that profit from the illegal occupation.”Tveit observed that, if strictly applied according to its reported terms, “this new legislation would have the effect of barring representatives of many churches around the world from entering Israel, from accompanying sister churches and fellow Christians in the region, and from visiting the holy places for Christians. This potentially impacts the religious freedom of many Christians around the world, and harms Christians in Israel and Palestine. It could mean that I cannot, as general secretary of the WCC, visit our member churches in Israel and Palestine anymore, nor go to the holy sites.”The WCC – whose 348 member churches represent more than 560 million Christians globally – has encouraged its member churches to consider in their own contexts appropriate non-violent means of opposing the occupation and of working for a just peace in Israel and Palestine according to their own moral principles and teachings. The WCC has a specific and longstanding policy inviting member churches to boycott Israeli settlement products and to reconsider their investments from the same perspective, and many of them have made statements and taken actions accordingly.“The WCC affirms and supports Israel’s right to exist, categorically rejects violence as a means of resolving the conflict, and has described anti-Semitism as a sin against God,” Tveit stressed. “But we, together with the United Nations and the vast majority of the international community, consider Israel’s 50 year-long occupation of the occupied Palestinian territories as illegal. And on this basis the WCC has encouraged boycotting goods from Israeli settlements in the occupied territories, divestment from companies that benefit from the occupation, investment in Palestinian enterprises that can stimulate the local economy, but not a general boycott of or sanctions against Israel.”“The WCC seeks an equal measure of justice and dignity for all people, with a just peace for Israelis and Palestinians alike,” Tveit continued, “but this legislation represents a form of isolationism that cannot be in Israel’s best interests as a member of the international community, let alone of the people of the region. It is a critical shift in the way Israel relates to the rest of the world, and also in their role as guardians of holy places for three religions. I hope and pray it will not prove to be the government’s actual policy and practice.” Comments (1) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL World Council of Churches ‘gravely concerned’ over Israel’s travel ban This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Steve Sh says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ecumenical & Interreligious, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Middle East Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Posted Mar 9, 2017 last_img read more


Episcopalians face challenges to help the hungry during pandemic


first_img Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI COVID-19, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis It’s also grab-and-go in New York at the Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen, just on a much larger scale. The second-largest feeding program in the United States, the soup kitchen typically serves about 1,200 people a sit-down meal in the nave of the Church of the Holy Apostles in Manhattan. It served 7,083 meals during the first two weeks of March, the ministry said on its Facebook page.At least until April 3, the meal has become a bagged lunch available between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. in the church’s front courtyard. Its weekly Backpack Pantry will also operate from the courtyard on Thursdays. The soup kitchen has suspended its large volunteer program, and staff is distributing food. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 26, 2020 Food and Faith, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Health & Healthcare Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Episcopalians face challenges to help the hungry during pandemic Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL [Episcopal News Service] “Hunger doesn’t go into quarantine.”That’s the reason 4Saints Food Pantry in Fort Worth, Texas, and similar ministries all across The Episcopal Church are coming up with new, safe ways to continue to serve people in their communities who depend on them for food and companionship. 4Saints, a ministry of four parishes all named for saints in the Diocese of Fort Worth’s eastern deanery, served 115 families on a cold and rainy March 20. Each client who drove through the parking lot of St. Luke’s in the Meadow got a bag of canned goods, canned and fresh meat, milk or juice, a carton of eggs and cereal. Families could also request diapers.“Hunger doesn’t go into quarantine,” Katie Sherrod, the Fort Worth diocese’s communications director and a member of St. Luke’s, wrote to Episcopal News Service in a Facebook message.The challenge is finding safe ways to provide food while adhering to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s physical distancing guidelines. Most dioceses have issued guidelines for the work.In addition, older volunteers who are the backbone of many outreach ministries are among those considered most vulnerable to COVID-19.“Our primary volunteer force is retired people,” said Linda Curtiss, director of the Bradley Beach Food Pantry housed at St. James Episcopal Church in Bradley Beach, New Jersey, on the Jersey Shore. “Most of our volunteers who can’t come anymore have said it’s because their families have told them, ‘Please don’t.’”Judy Staggard, a longtime volunteer at the Bradley Beach Food Pantry at St. James Episcopal Church in the New Jersey shore town, moves a crate of food into place March 24 so other volunteers can load up more bags for the pantry’s clients. Photo: Linda CurtissThe pantry is not alone in its dependence on older volunteers. Lay leaders in the Diocese of New Jersey who participated in a video conference in support of outreach ministries on March 20 repeatedly returned to the issue. The participants discussed whether high school and college students, now home because of school closings, might be recruited to bridge the volunteer gap.Curtiss is grateful that new volunteers have offered to help because she expects that, for the foreseeable future, “people who thought they could volunteer this week decide they can’t come next week, and that’s even if they don’t get sick,” she told ENS by phone.A sign outside the Bradley Beach Food Pantry on March 24 outlines the new reality brought on by COVID-19 restrictions. Photo: Linda CurtissCurtiss spent the latter part of last week redesigning the pantry’s operation to limit the exposure of clients and volunteers to each other. The pantry will now only distribute prepacked bags, rather than allowing people to request items. When the pantry is closed, volunteers pack bags alone or in pairs while maintaining their distance. Others restock shelves when baggers are not present. The move to pre-bagging means fewer volunteers are needed when the pantry is open from 10 a.m. to noon Monday to Friday and 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday.The Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations supports the stimulus bill in response to the COVID-19 public health and economic crisis. To learn more about how you can offer your support, click here.Across the church, feeding ministries small and large are adapting. For instance, on March 25, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Marquette, Michigan, turned its monthly community dine-in meal that typically serves 20-30 people into to-go food bags available for pickup at the church during the meal’s usual time. “We just hope it doesn’t snow,” organizer Mary Sullivan told ENS in an email earlier in the day.Volunteers are packing the bags at home, adhering to a specific protocol, and dropping them at the church, according to Kathy Binoniemi, communications coordinator for the Diocese of Northern Michigan and a St. Paul’s member. The baggers can also slip in a bar of antibacterial soap and a prayer note, Sullivan said.When the parish asked members to help by contributing from a specific list of canned goods and prepackaged items, Binoniemi told ENS via email March 20, it received more than was needed. Leftovers will be given to a local group working to get food to children who are home because schools are closed.In the Finger Lakes region of New York, St. John’s in Catharine has the Barnie Parker Sharing Shed stocked with boxed foods, adult diapers and feminine hygiene and cleaning products. The shed is open around the clock, and people can take what they need. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service In Hawaii, the Waimea Community Meal based at St. James’ Episcopal Church on the Big Island suspended its Thursday community meal on March 19 and will reopen it as a drive-through service on March 26. Volunteers routinely serve a cafeteria-style sit-down meal to as many as 350 people in 90 minutes at an outdoor pavilion on church property.On March 26, people will get what coordinator Sue Dela Cruz called the ministry’s version of a Japanese bento box, with a hot soup or stew, rice and a dessert. She told ENS in a phone interview on March 23 that she has set up a three-month rotation of menus for the boxes. She’s developed new protocols so that a reduced number of prep and cook volunteers can work at a distance from each other during separate shifts.Dela Cruz and other feeding program coordinators know that they offer not just food but also social interaction for both volunteers and guests to ease people’s loneliness. The Waimea meal always features live entertainment and gives diners the chance to “talk story,” the traditional Hawaiian way of taking as much time as needed to discuss both the mundane and the profound.She and the committee that organizes the ministry are trying to come up with a theme for each Thursday’s drive-through “to make it fun for the people coming through and for our volunteers passing out the boxes,” Dela Cruz said.Everywhere, feeding program ministers are thinking about the future. Back in New Jersey, Derek Minno-Bloom, the director of social justice at Trinity Church in Asbury Park, said about 175 people came to the church’s food pantry on a recent Tuesday. “We gave enough food in one day that normally takes us three days to give away,” he said. “I imagine it’s just going to get bigger.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg retired in July as Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more


Twin House / y+M design office


first_img Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/775191/twin-house-y-plus-m Clipboard 2014 Japan CopyHouses•Hiratsuka, Japan photographs:  Yohei SasakuraPhotographs:  Yohei SasakuraBuilding Area:66.40㎡Total Floor Area:127.08㎡Site Area:114.39㎡City:HiratsukaCountry:JapanMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Yohei SasakuraText description provided by the architects. The house is located on an overcrowded residential area in Kouchi city. We planned the house to be filled up capacity of the premise whose size is width 6 meters * depth 17 meters. We tried to reduce voids to keep the building coverage ratio less than 60%.Save this picture!© Yohei SasakuraOn the other hand the void which occupies about 40% of the premise is used as a parking area for two cards, a courtyard which includes stairs and a terrace.Save this picture!© Yohei SasakuraThe house is filled up capacity of the premise. So it is concerned that the house gives a feeling of pressure to neighbors and that ventilation and sunshine lighting through the courtyard because the outer wall is high.Save this picture!DiagramTo resolve these concern we designed the house that is divided into two house volumes. So that the two house volumes fit the neighbor’s house and reduce the feeling of pressure. To ensure the sunshine into the courtyard we save the height of the house volume. And to ensure ventilation we made the courtyard connect to the parking. As the result we can manage line of sight from the courtyard and rooms inside to sky. And it realizes sunny, opened and well-ventilated courtyard.Save this picture!© Yohei SasakuraThe client’s friends get together at the courtyard to enjoy both inside and outside space through the stairs. And a herringbone array gate satisfies both security and privacy for the people.Save this picture!Upper Floor PlanWe designed elongated house in accordance with elongated site. In addition further elongated design around the courtyard ensures enough sunshine and ventilation in each room. We also designed glass curtain wall around the courtyard. It ensures line of sight among each room and breadth of space more than the real dimension.Save this picture!© Yohei SasakuraWe set a fan with temperature sensor on top of the house. The fan works as an exhaust heating in summer and a circulator in summer not to use air-conditioning equipment as much as possible.Save this picture!© Yohei SasakuraThe twin house is a special house that two house volumes connect each other and become one house. The house doesn’t need turning on lighting at afternoon because of the bright courtyard. The house also provides bright and well-ventilated living environment and pleasant space where friends come together and enjoy.Save this picture!© Yohei SasakuraProject gallerySee allShow lessOpen Call: A Museum in the Making_Architecture CompetitionBuilt Projects & MasterplansCha’er 3 / reMIX StudioSelected Projects Share Twin House / y+M design office “COPY” ArchDaily Year:  Architects: y+M design office Year Completion year of this architecture project center_img Twin House / y+M design officeSave this projectSaveTwin House / y+M design office 2014 Year:  Houses Save this picture!© Yohei Sasakura+ 26 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/775191/twin-house-y-plus-m Clipboard “COPY” Photographs CopyAbout this officey+M design officeOfficeFollowProductsWoodGlassSteel#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesHiratsukaJapanPublished on October 15, 2015Cite: “Twin House / y+M design office” 14 Oct 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsCompositesMitrexPhotovoltaic Solar Cladding – BIPV CladdingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BronzeBathroomsGeberitBathroom Series – ONESkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight F100 CircularMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassAluminium CompositesAmerican MetalcraftAluminum Panels – Decorative Fencing for BridgesPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsWater Facade PanelDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Concealed Sliding Door | MareaWall / Ceiling LightsiGuzziniExterior Light – WalkyWoodPlycoWood Boards – Birch LaserplyMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more


HUD Secretary Carson Responds to REO Controversy


first_img David Wharton, Managing Editor at the Five Star Institute, is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, where he received his B.A. in English and minored in Journalism. Wharton has over 16 years’ experience in journalism and previously worked at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm, as Associate Content Editor, focusing on producing media content related to tax and accounting principles and government rules and regulations for accounting professionals. Wharton has an extensive and diversified portfolio of freelance material, with published contributions in both online and print media publications. Wharton and his family currently reside in Arlington, Texas. He can be reached at [email protected] Ben Carson House Financial Services Committee REO 2019-05-22 David Wharton Tagged with: Ben Carson House Financial Services Committee REO About Author: David Wharton The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / HUD Secretary Carson Responds to REO Controversy Related Articles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: Investing in Short-Term Rentals Next: The Next Frontier in Home-Flipping Investment Following a controversial exchange during a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Tuesday, Dr. Benjamin S. Carson, Secretary, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, responded to DS News to provide an official statement.During the hearing, Rep. Katie Porter (D-California) asked Carson about REO rates for FHA and the GSEs, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Carson’s response, in which he appeared to either mishear or misunderstand “REO” as “OREO” soon became fodder for headlines during the day that followed.In response to a request for comment, DS News was provided with the following statement:My job is to focus on the real issues of what happens when a family can no longer pay their mortgage. FHA, through its lender partners, works extremely hard to avoid foreclosure whenever possible and to keep families in their homes. However, foreclosures can’t always be avoided. The question about what happens after a foreclosure is an important one. FHA moves heaven and earth to make sure these ‘real estate owned’ properties are sold to other families so they don’t become a neighborhood blight.Congresswoman Porter appears to believe we’re still in the middle of a foreclosure crisis in this country. We are not. Today, the number of foreclosed-upon homes, or REOs, are far below the levels of a decade ago. So, while she wants to focus on acronyms, I’ll continue to focus on families.Speaking to The Hill Wednesday afternoon, Carson said, “One of the reasons that I told [Porter] I would like for her to meet with our people is because she was a subject-matter expert in that 10 or 15 years ago. At that time we did have a lot of REO properties, we had over 65,000 of them. Now we have only about 6,500 and we do everything we can to keep families who are affected from foreclosure. That’s why the number is down so low. I think that she obviously is thinking about the way things used to be and has no idea what’s going on now.”Ed Delgado, President and CEO of Five Star Global, said, “During my discussions with Secretary Carson, I have found him to be not only knowledgeable but—just as importantly—caring and deeply committed to the important task of protecting and promoting American homeownership. That commitment is critical as the industry continues to work with HUD and other government agencies to develop common-sense policy that is in line with current economic realities while being responsive to the needs of the homeowners that we serve.”Editor’s note: Five Star Global is the parent company of DS News. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Save HUD Secretary Carson Responds to REO Controversycenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News, REO May 22, 2019 2,744 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more


Water charges could be charges deducted from salaries or benefits


first_img By admin – March 24, 2015 Pinterest Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Twitter Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Homepage BannerNews Water charges could be charges deducted from salaries or benefits WhatsApp More details have emerged of how the government intends to recoup unpaid water charges.New laws will see Irish Water have the power to go to the District Court for an attachment order, in a process that’s expected to work more quickly than regular court proceedings.If its granted, the order would see outstanding charges deducted from someone’s salary or benefits before they’re paid out.According to newspaper reports today, the charge could also be registered against the property, so that it couldn’t be sold without the debt being paid.Donegal Deputy Thomas Pringle says the Government are scaremongering:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/tpring.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. WhatsApp Google+ Facebookcenter_img Pinterest Facebook Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Previous articleRaphoe one step away from reaching finalNext articleGiven could yet start against Poland admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more


Solar array, downtown midrise seek tax breaks with IDA


first_imgFollowing the discussion on the Enfield solar array, the IDA will next turn its attention to a proposed apartment project currently under review in the city of Ithaca. The planned residential development by McKinley Development calls for a six-story, 301,900 square-foot apartment building with a 267‐space internal parking garage and 353 apartments mixed between studio, 1, 2 and 3‐bedroom units, to be built on what is mostly surface parking on the eastern end of downtown Ithaca. The project includes other site improvements including the extension of the Six Mile Creekwalk to the eastern end of the site, outdoor seating, landscaping, lighting and other site amenities. Potential discrepancy, but city planners told me prior to the last Planning Board meeting that it was 326 units, but there have been major internal revisions as noted in the planning board review last month. It’s always possible larger units have been split and reconfigured, like a three-bedroom into two one-bedroom units. Both the Norbut solar array and the McKinley apartments are set as discussion items for this month’s meeting, meaning no vote will be taken on either project until at least June’s IDA meeting. Comments can be submitted to IAED’s Ina Arthur prior to 9 AM Wednesday at [email protected], and if you want to watch, the meeting is scheduled to livestream at 2:30 PM Wednesday. Brian Crandall reports on housing and development for the Ithaca Voice. He can be reached at [email protected] More by Brian Crandall Atlanta-based McKinley is requesting the mouthful that is the “CIITAP Financial Need / Enhanced Energy Large Multi-Family Project Incentive”. In other words, the project is being designed to achieve the 12 points required under the ‘Easy Path’ compliance path of the 2025 requirements for the City of Ithaca Energy Code Supplement, also known as the “Green Building Policy”. For going above and beyond the current six points required, they can apply for a tax incentive. Points come from feature like air-source heat pumps, low-flow water fixtures, LED lighting, high-efficiency insulation and HVAC systems, and all electrical energy being sourced from an off-site solar array. (You can read in-depth about the plans here). As other developers have noted lately, the application talks about how the price of various construction materials are near or at all-time highs. The estimated town, county and school district taxes paid on the entire 252-acre parcel last year was $19,682, and without a PILOT the taxes would be $400,000 per year. In this case, the project would pay $45,000 per year in the PILOT, as well as the $18,000 payment to Enfield directly (which is outside the IDA’s review). Since about one-third of the parcel will remain undeveloped, it will not be affected by the PILOT and still pay regular taxes, $7,479 worth. In sum, the new tax revenue generated over what the property pays now will be about $32,000 in year one, plus the $18,000 paid directly to the town. First in the discussion will be Norbut Solar Farms’ plan for 15 Megawatt solar array project in the town of Enfield. To put that in perspective, even in Ithaca’s notoriously cloudy climate, 15 MW of the latest and greatest in solar panel technology will be enough to meet the annual power consumption of an estimated 2,400 homes. The Rochester-based energy firm plans to build the $20.1 million array in three separate 5 MW arrays on 157 acres of a 252.54-acre parcel that’s been used for farmland along South Applegate Road south of Mecklenburg Road. Technical note, because each array is seperate, they each have their own IDA application and PILOT agreement. Brian Crandall Typically, the IDA’s standard PILOT for solar projects is range of $4,200-$4,800 per megawatt, with a 2% increase in the PILOT each year for 25 years. In this case, Norbut is seeking a financially similar deviation from this policy, where the PILOT payment would be $3,000 per megawatt plus $1,200 per megawatt ($18,000 total) paid directly to the Town of Enfield (so $4,200 total, but split differently). Both amounts would increase 2% per year for 30 years. While the IDA letter says the town board of Enfield has given their consent to the proposal, an email sent by board member Robert Lynch after this article was published says the town has not yet discussed the proposal.As noted in the memo prepared by Ithaca Area Economic Development’s Heather McDaniel, there is a cost-benefit for existing NYSEG customers in Tompkins County: discounted solar electric rates. “(c)ommercial and residential customers who purchase electricity from NYSEG will be able to purchase “green” solar energy at a discount without investing in their own systems. The combined annual savings on electricity and delivery charges on an estimated mix of 40% residential and 60% commercial customer bills could amount to $80,000-$100,000 a year in savings, or over $2,000,000 over the life of the project.” McKinley’s plan for complying with the Workforce Housing Policy does not include setting aside low-moderate income units in its building, but instead paying $1,765,000 to the Community Housing Development Fund once construction funding has been secured. The firm states in the application that its market-rate units will be competitive and “below the current high end of the market”. Tagged: downtown ithaca, Heather McDaniel, IAED, Mckinley Development, solar energy, TCIDA, Town of Enfield Although a minor part of the calculation, the site would create 50-70 construction jobs during buildout, and support a handful of part-time jobs after completion – security, snow removal and mowing, and maintenance workers. The project is finishing up environmental review with Enfield’s Planning Board, so if the IDA approves the PILOT, construction on the arrays is planned to begin this fall with completion by the fall of 2022. ITHACA, N.Y. — The Tompkins County Industrial Development Agency has a busy agenda planned for Wednesday afternoon’s meeting. The agency will be reviewing applications for a payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) agreement for a solar array project in the town of Enfield, and begin discussions on sought-after tax breaks for a project on the east side of Downtown Ithaca. While parking is not required within the city’s CBD-60 zoning, the Project replaces the existing Gateway Center surface parking (152 spaces) that are being displaced by this Project. The Project also provides 115 parking spaces for residents of the Project, and 122 spaces of the total 267 spaces will be available to the public after business hours. The project would create 100 construction jobs at any one time with a commitment of 35% to local labor, and ten permanent jobs with an average pay of about $41,907 in maintenance and leasing (McKinley is committing to a living wage for all positions), and would open to tenants in August 2023. While the application goes out of its way to call the plans general market-rate housing with no preference in tenants, the rental cycle still revolves around the student population, and about 40% of Downtown Ithaca renters are either Cornell graduate and professional students or a smaller number of Ithaca College students. Norbut Solar Farms Enfield Array The state doesn’t collect taxes on solar energy projects, but towns and counties can choose to collect property taxes if they wish. In an effort to encourage the development of renewable energy sources, Tompkins County and most of its towns will entertain PILOT agreement proposals so that sustainable energy developers don’t have to pay the full taxable amount on their site improvements, which would otherwise make the projects prohibitively expensive (Groton tends to be more difficult than the others). With an estimated cost of $117,631,108 for the project, the sought tax incentives would save $15,743,029 in property taxes, $2,682,120 in sales tax exemptions on the purchase of construction materials, and $182,328 in exemptions from the mortgage recording tax. Over ten years, it would pay $7,862,152 in new property taxes on top of what the site currently pays. (On a side note, they would also pay Travis Hyde Companies $12,115,000 for acquisition of the project site, and one can’t help but wonder if that would indirectly help the Library Place project resume construction.) McKinley Ithaca LLC (401 East State/Martin Luther King Jr. Street)last_img read more