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A revolutionary understanding of the national question


first_imgMonica Moorehead at Reclaim Pride demonstration in New York, June 2019.This article is based on a talk given at a July 25 Workers World Party meeting in New York City that addressed the theme “Fighting against Racism and for National Sovereignty.”This talk will not give a blow-by-blow account of all the attacks that racist Trump has made against the four progressive congresswomen of color — Reps. Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib — known as “The Squad.”  But these four congresspeople symbolically represent the global working class, despite their political affiliation and loyalty to the Democratic Party.  The fact that their respective nationalities — Somali, Puerto Rican, Black and Palestinian — represent millions of oppressed peoples globally is an inspiration to the movement for revolutionary change. In the end, these racist attacks are not isolated from attacks on the global working class, which include workers and oppressed of all nationalities and gender expressions who are super-exploited and super-oppressed by the same bosses and bankers. Whatever form the struggle against racism may take — in a bourgeois arena like electoral politics or outside that arena — as revolutionary socialists we must be prepared to take on the fight against racism whenever and however it rears its ugly head. This is because of the historical, theoretical and practical significance of the national question and its relationship to the class struggle. Origins of national oppression in the U.S. The expansion of U.S. imperialism was rooted in the theft of Indigenous lands, begun in the drive to colonization launched by Christopher Columbus’ claim of “discovery” in 1492. The crimes of the U.S. were marked by such actions as U.S. President Andrew Jackson’s infamous “Indian Removal Act” of 1830 and encompassed the U.S. theft of more than half of Mexico’s territory in the bloody war of 1848.  And then there was slavery — where an estimated 4 million people of African descent were owned outright after being kidnapped to provide the unpaid labor needed to farm and develop the stolen land. That development led to a sharp economic clash between two opposing systems — slavery which served the interests of the Southern slaveowners and capitalism which served the interests of the Northern capitalists. The clash culminated in the U.S. Civil War — the opening of the ongoing struggle for Black Liberation in the U.S.  After the Emancipation and the end of that war, any hope of bringing about political equality for Black people on equal footing with white people was shattered into a million pieces with the overthrow of the 10-year period known as Radical or Black Reconstruction. The first of many broken promises — for what would have been reparations — was the failure to provide freed Black people with the self-sustaining 40 acres and a mule, along with education and political representation. The quest for political equality was replaced by racist “Jim Crow” or legal segregation — codified by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1898.  This was reinforced by penal codes, lynchings, police brutality and mass incarceration that classified Black people, no matter their social status or where they lived, as criminals and second-class citizens.Based on these historical facts and Marxist ideology, Black people constitute not just a nation, but an oppressed nation — oppressed by an oppressor nation dominated by white supremacy, emanating from ruling-class ideas rooted in the capitalist economic system. The struggle against racism based upon a foundation of national oppression is not separate and apart from the class struggle — in fact, this principle is central to the prosecution of the class struggle.   National oppression as a theoretical, practical conceptNational oppression is a Marxist-Leninist concept that Lenin expounded in “Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism.” He explained that nations of peoples — be they of African descent, Latinx, Indigenous, Arab, etc. —  are super-exploited, along with the resources of their homelands, by the richest capitalist countries. This expands the wealth and territory of the small class of billionaires who own the banks and corporations. This is how the world is divided into oppressed nations and oppressor nations.As a young Black woman raised in the apartheid South, I was radicalized by the struggle to smash white supremacy during the era of the Black Panther Party and the Attica prison rebellion (1966-71).  However, it was the unwavering theoretical position of Workers World Party chairperson Sam Marcy regarding the defense of oppressed nations as central to class unity that won me to revolutionary Marxism.Marcy wrote the article titled “The right of self-determination and the class struggle” in November 1983. I want to quote from this extensively because he said it best: “Of all the great domestic political problems facing the working class and the oppressed people, none surpasses in importance the relationship of national oppression to the class struggle.  Indeed, one may say that it is at the heart of the basic social problem in the United States. It touches every form of social existence, and no sector of society is free from it.“For Marxists in particular it is the acid test of the correctness of their general political program. It is also a test of the revolutionary integrity of the party, in particular as this is manifested in day to day practical application. Probably nowhere else is theory so severely tested by practice as in the field of the national question.”Marcy went on to say: “To many in the progressive and working-class movement the relationship between national oppression and class conflict appears as a choice between two supposedly contradictory phenomena.“To socialists of the pre-World War I generation and to many avowed Marxists of that period (and even of decades later), choosing or giving priority to the national question, or as some put it, ‘giving priority to the struggle against racism,’ meant the abandonment of the class struggle and a surrender to bourgeois nationalism.“Needless to say, such a view of Marxism, in addition to being an error in principle and a violation of basic Marxist theory on the national question, was mostly propounded by whites, even those who saw themselves as adherents of socialism and even of Marxism. Upon the solution of the national question may very well depend the destiny of the working class in the struggle against capitalism as well as the future of socialism.”National oppression and the class struggleMarcy’s emphasis on socialists putting their theoretical understanding of the national question into practical application is critical, because to fail to do so does more harm to prosecuting the class struggle.  Marcy timed the writing of the 1983 article to meet the acid test of the first presidential campaign of the Civil Rights leader, the Rev. Jesse Jackson. His campaign was challenging the racism of the Democratic Party leadership, the Democratic National Committee, notwithstanding that the mass base of that party has many Black and Brown people, then and now. For Workers World Party, we viewed the significance of the Jackson campaign beyond its form within the Democratic Party organization. In its essence, the Jackson campaign was a catalyst for Black and other oppressed nationalities to complete the unfinished bourgeois democratic revolution by extending and winning full social rights for Black people and other disenfranchised sectors of our class. Marcy stated in the same article: “The national question has for centuries been covered up by a plethora of lies and deceit. The intent is to convey the impression that it does not exist; or if it does exist, it is being solved; or at least its significance is diminishing due to the glory and virtues of the democratic processes of monopoly capitalism.” Twenty years before the Jackson campaign, the Black Liberation movement was divided into two distinct wings — the Civil Rights Movement represented a liberal bourgeois sector led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., while the revolutionary Black nationalist militant wing was represented by Malcolm X.  While Workers World Party felt the closest political affinity with Malcolm X and the current he represented, even before he left the Nation of Islam, we never pitted these two wings of the Black movement against each other in our propaganda or in concrete solidarity.That is due to our party’s belief in building class unity against a common oppressor.  Our party was very sensitive to the besieged Black masses in the South who were at that time on the front lines against fascistic Jim Crow. The lesson then and now is that whenever the masses or a sector of our class is engaged in struggle against racism — as they were in the 1960s or in the 1980s — the form of that struggle against racism becomes secondary and must be given support even if that support is critical, while at the same time showing concrete solidarity. Painting of Black Congressional representatives during Reconstruction.The Squad and the struggle against national oppressionCompare the politics of the Squad to the Jackson campaign. While we all know that the Democratic Party is as much a party of big business, war and racism as the Republican Party, The Squad’s politics in general are to the left of the party they belong to. These congresspeople defend the rights of migrants, including calling for abolishing Immigration and Customs Enforcement and closing down the detention centers, uplifting the rights of the Palestinian people to return to their homeland, supporting Medicare for all, deploring Trump’s attempts to cut over 3 million more people off the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and more. And while Bernie Sanders claims to be a “socialist,” he hasn’t specifically mentioned the attacks on The Squad or defended them, although he has come out in general against Trump’s racist and xenophobic language.  This is the same Bernie Sanders who only mentioned Black Lives Matter during his 2016 bid for the presidency when Black protesters heckled him at one of his campaign rallies.   The burning question now is what is next in this ongoing struggle against racism — especially with the presidential elections about 16 months away?The City Council of Charlotte, N.C. — where the Republican National Convention is to take place in August 2020 — voted 9-2 on July 23 to condemn Trump’s racist remarks. This action was similar to the July 16 vote by the House of Representatives that condemned Trump as a racist. But these are symbolic, nonbinding votes.Is the Charlotte City Council going to cancel the convention?  Hell, no! It will bring in millions of dollars. And while Democrats like Nancy Pelosi may have called out Trump on his racism, they will not go so far as to mobilize the masses in solidarity with The Squad or demand the closing of those horrific detention centers. The Democrats could easily take that action because they have the resources and allegiance of a large sector of the masses, including the trade unions. But the Democratic Party leadership fears a mass mobilization in the streets that would become more independent, move more and more to the left, and be driven to militancy. We must continue to defend The Squad — or any other prominent figures, politicians or not, attacked by racists. We must also continue to distinguish that defense from any endorsement of the two major bourgeois parties, which will do and say anything to occupy the White House, Congress and other capitalist institutions that administer class rule. We must continue to organize and unite to shut down the camps, to shut down mass incarceration, to shut down police brutality, to shut down all forms of white supremacy. This can all lead to a complete shutdown of capitalism — toward realizing a socialist future.  Build international solidarity! Build a Workers World! FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more


Une dépêche (version anglaise)


first_img chapô News News RSF_en Follow the news on Related documents Document 1PDF – 169.93 KB Organisation June 2, 2004 Find out more Copy right Media independence WhistleblowersViolenceUnited Nations March 7, 2016 Une dépêche (version anglaise) Anas Tadili condamné à 6 mois de prison ferme Receive email alerts to go further Help by sharing this information body Media independence WhistleblowersViolenceUnited Nations last_img read more


Self-Driving Storage, Part 2: Storage Parallels with Autonomous Vehicles


first_imgIn my last blog, I explored the role of artificial intelligence (AI) in creating intelligent storage systems that learn via algorithms and make critical decisions with no human involvement. I described how the new PowerMax from Dell EMC uses a reinforced learning model to autonomously make resource allocation decisions at high-speed while serving millions of IOPS to achieve the latency targets of mission-critical applications. Taking this a step further, I will now describe the evolution of intelligent storage systems that are truly autonomous, akin to self-driving cars.  If we can build self-driving cars, can we build “self-driving” storage systems?.An autonomous car and a storage system have fundamental similarities. Consider this:Both are very complex systems – dealing with a TON of simultaneously occurring events happening very fastBoth have a lot riding on them – human lives in one case and mission-critical business operations in the other that in many cases impact human lives as wellWhile the image most people have in their minds when they hear “self-driving car” is a vehicle that drives completely by itself, in fact there are multiple levels of automation, with Level 5 being the Holy Grail of 100% autonomous.I have a similar gradation for storage systems.  I see the journey to a fully autonomous storage system as consisting of four steps:Level 1: Application-CentricWith the self-driving car, you tell it where you want to go, not which roads and turns to take and what speed to drive at. Similarly, the way you interact with the storage system has to be in terms of what you are trying to accomplish – the application you wish to run. You care about the application not what the storage system needs to do to run that application. You want to tell the storage system that you wish to run a web-based transaction processing application using a relational database and have it take care of the rest.Level 2: Policy-DrivenNext, you typically want to tell the car whether to take the direct fastest route or a scenic route through the backroads. Similarly, you want to set some service level objectives for the application you just told the storage system you want to run – is it a high priority production application or a best-effort dev-test instance? Does it need additional data protection via remote copies? How frequently?Level 3: Self-AwareNow the car has what it needs to get driving. But if it is to drive itself, it needs to be “self-aware”. For example, it needs to know whether it is in the lane or about to stray, if it is a safe distance from the car ahead of it, running low on fuel, etc. The storage system analog is telemetry about how the system is operating – how “close to the edge.” This is where the industry has been lagging. While we have a lot of telemetry, we typically haven’t been very good at analyzing the data to determine if we’re about to drive off the cliff – we still rely on humans to figure this out. And typically, the humans get involved after something has gone horribly wrong. The first step here is to make the system self-aware – instead of throwing a whole lot of data at the human, the system should be able to analyze the data and tell the user how close it is to the edge. And that sets us up for the next and final part…Level 4: Self-OptimizingOnce you know how close you are to the edge, the system needs to be able to adjust its behavior/operation to avoid going over the edge. In the self-driving car world, a very simple example is adaptive cruise control where the car regulates its speed to keep a safe distance from the vehicle ahead sensed by LIDAR. This is exactly what Dell EMC PowerMax can do as shown in the image below – the algorithms are designed to detect changes in the environment and change key system behaviors accordingly to try meeting the need of the applications, and prevent the system from getting into catastrophic situations. In other words, you may want/need to drive at 65 MPH, but right now you can’t unless you change your lane.Dell EMC’s solutions have had application-centric and policy-driven capabilities for years now as well as rudimentary levels of self-aware/optimizing capabilities in technologies like FAST (Fully Automated Storage Tiering). The new PowerMax takes this history of innovation in building intelligent storage systems to the next level by incorporating machine learning techniques. Just like in the general AI field, we are applying these techniques to progressively more complex scenarios inside our storage systems. As the scenarios get broader, there is a need for more contextual information to make the right decisions. In the car world, an example is relying on real-time traffic updates from a global information system to choose a route that incurs minimal delay. In the storage world, we have CloudIQ – our brain in the cloud. CloudIQ observes and remembers all operational information about the storage arrays in the field. It also uses machine learning techniques to learn how each system is behaving, how the workloads it is serving are changing over time, etc. It is also looking at the entire population of systems in the field to learn patterns of behaviors and/or environmental conditions to learn and predict – and thus avoid impacting a system’s health or behavior.Why does all this matter?At Dell EMC, we are on a mission to deliver the infrastructure for the next industrial revolution that accelerates human progress. AI is going to be a key tool in this mission, just like how social networking fundamentally changed the way we live, interact and work. With a long history of storage innovation, we have a unique value proposition that our customers rely on for their own innovation journey as we go on this mission together.So, who will get there first – a fully autonomous car or a fully autonomous storage system? My bet is on the latter!last_img read more


Jennifer Pharr Davis Releases Her New Book, The Pursuit of Endurance


first_imgIn her new book released yesterday, Jennifer Pharr Davis, National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, shares her secrets on how to persevere and push through life’s challenges both on and off the trail.“It takes one to know one. Jennifer Pharr Davis, the first woman to set a speed record on the A.T., provides powerful and personal insights into ten of the world’s most accomplished and inspiring endurance athletes in her new book. Among them are two pillars of Appalachian adventure: 16-time A.T. thru-hiker Warren Doyle and former A.T. speed record holder David Horton. Both Doyle and Horton have stunning outdoor achievements, but they have dedicated themselves to helping others reach their goals—including Pharr Davis. She also ventures out on the trail with ultra legends Andrew Thompson, Scott Williamson, Heather Anderson, and Scott Jurek, following the highs and lows of their record-chasing journeys. Best of all, Pharr Davis shares her own experiences and reflections on and off the trail. All of these phenomenal athletes are also everyday human beings who stumble, divorce, fail, and struggle like the rest of us—and also find a way to persevere.” – Will Harlan, Editor In CheifI’m excited and crazy nervous. The people and message inside of this book are very dear to me. I appreciate any orders, shares, and encouraging words. Thanks y’all! – Jennifer Pharr DavisJennifer Pharr Davis is an American long-distance hiker, an author, a speaker, a National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, contributor to Blue Ridge Outdoors and an ambassador for the American Hiking Society. She has hiked more than fourteen thousand miles on six different continents. In 2011, Pharr Davis set the unofficial record for the fastest thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail with a time of 46 days, 11 hours, and 20 minutes, an average of 47 miles a day, a record she held for four years. Pharr Davis lives in Asheville, North Carolina, with her husband, Brew, and their daughter and son, Charley and Gus.  Jennifer Pharr Davis will be hosting several events over the next couple of months including trail runs, readings, and Q&A sessions. To learn more, check out her Facebook Page or Author Profile Page.Hardcover | $27.00Published by VikingApr 10, 2018 | 320 PagesGrab Your Copy Today!last_img read more


New and Notes


first_img February 15, 2005 News & Notes New and Notes News and Notes Edith Osman of Carlton Fields in Miami spoke and served as program co-chair at The Florida Bar CLE Committee and the Family Law Section Seminar titled, “Fees and Costs in Family Law — How to Get Awards and Avoid Pitfalls.” Osman addressed issues relating to retainer agreements. Douglas M. McIntosh of McIntosh, Sawran, Peltz, Cartaya & Petrucelli, P.A., was selected by Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad Law Center as one of the attorneys to be featured in the “30 Years: 30 Stories” profiles for the center’s 30th Anniversary. Bryan Miller of Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart, P.A., addressed a group of journalists during a panel discussion about reporting in an environment of eroding legal protections for journalists. The event was sponsored by the Society of Professional Journalists. Jeannine Smith Williams of the City of St. Petersburg Legal Department was elected president of the Fred G. Minnis Sr. Bar Association. Robert E. Panoff was chosen to be a member of the Internal Revenue Service Advisory Council. Richard Warren Rappaport of Adorno & Yoss hosted the Steinway/BMI Music & Arts Showcase in Miami. Cristin A. Conley of Carlton Fields in Tampa co-wrote a chapter in the first edition of Limited Liability Companies in Florida. Conley co-wrote the second chapter titled, “Comparative Analysis: When and Why L.L.C.s are a Better Alternative.” Ervin A. Gonzalez was a featured speaker at the Truck Accident Litigation from Start to Finish in Florida Seminar presented by the National Business Institute. Gonzalez spoke on “Trucking Accidents: Preparing a Case for Trial.” John Fumero of Lewis, Longman & Walker was elected to the board of HISPAC of Palm Beach County. David W. Bianchi of Stewart, Tilghman, Fox & Bianchi, P.A., in Miami spoke at the National Fraternal Law Conference in Cincinnati on the subject of hazing and what fraternities and sororities can do to prevent it. Heather M. Kowalski of Shutts & Bowen LLP in Orlando was recently elected to the board of the Downtown Orlando Arts District. Jack A. Reiter Adorno & Yoss recently spoke at the North Miami Beach City/County Attorneys’ Luncheon. His topic was “Help! How Do You Handle Appeals Involving Administrative and Municipal Decisions?” Michael C. Gongora of Steinberg & Associates, P.A., in Miami Beach was recently elected vice chair of the City of Miami Code Enforcement Board. Gongora also was appointed to the board of governors of the Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce for the 2004-2005 term. Roy M. Hartman of Sacher, Zelman, Van Sant, Paul, Beiley, Hartman, Rolnick & Waldman, P.A. in Miami spoke recently at the Lorman Educational Services CLE seminar titled, “Sarbanes-Oxley Act in Florida.” Hartman gave a lecture addressing, “Legal Updates on Sarbanes- Oxley.” Armando E. Lacasa of Ruden McClosky in Miami was recently appointed chair of the ABA’s Latin America and Caribbean Law Initiative Council. Nanci S. Landy of Landy and Asselta, P.A., in North Miami Beach conducted a continuing education program for the Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants titled, “Partners and Employees: Avoiding an Ugly Business Divorce and What to do About the Kids.” Jerome Ira Solkoff of Jerome Ira Solkoff, P.A., in Deerfield Beach will have his Elder Law Forms Manual published by Thomson West. Additionally, Solkoff was recently appointed to a committee on regional and telephonic seminars associated with the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. Steven Brodie of Carlton Fields participated as a member of a speaker’s panel at the 29th Florida Risk and Insurance Management Society’s regional conference. Brodie presented, “Merging Issues in Director’s and Officer’s Insurance.” Joe Kern, associate general counsel with Darden Restaurants, was elected chair of the state board of directors of Easter Seals Florida. Additionally, Phil Storey of Stump, Storey, Callahan, Dietrich & Spears, P.A., was elected vice chair. Douglas Molloy recently returned from Brazil as part of a commission studying global slavery and related crimes. Molloy interviewed and taught Brazilian federal police, law enforcement officers, and judges on the subject of U.S. and Brazilian efforts to stop sex slavery, indentured servitude, and domestic servitude. He traveled to Sao Paulo, Belo Horizonte, and Rio de Janeiro. Michael Chesal of Kluger, Peretz, Kaplan & Berlin, P.L., was appointed to the board of directors of Yeshiva Toras Chaim/Toras Emes Academy of Miami. Frank M. Petosa of Petosa & Associates, P.L., in Boca Raton was a recent featured speaker at the 2004 Fall Advanced Trial Skills Seminar sponsored by the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers. Petosa’s topic was titled, “Beware of the Arbitration Clause.” Brad E. Coren of the Rosen-Coren Agency was inducted into the Rotary Club of Weston. Michael Rosenberg of Packman, Neuwahl & Rosenberg served as a discussion leader at two programs: “Foreign Investment in the United States – Tax and Related Matters,” sponsored by The Florida Institute of CPAs; and “Estate & Gift Taxation of Nonresident Aliens in the United States” sponsored by The Florida Institute of CPAs. Robert Galt III of Kirkpatrick & Lockhart LLP in Miami was appointed to the Executive Committee of the Barry University Board of Trustees. James Porter with Ruden McClosky in Tampa was appointed to the Hillsborough County Arts Council by the Hillsborough County Board of Commissioners. Harold E. Kaplan was the keynote speaker and presented, “The HIPAA Final Security Rules for Physicians’ Offices” at the 2005 Keiser Computer Technology Update Program. William N. Shepherd of the Office of Statewide Prosecution in West Palm Beach was appointed the young lawyer member of the council of the ABA’s Criminal Justice Section. Christine Donoghue of GrayRobinson in Tampa was elected to serve on the Florida Defense Lawyers Association board of directors for 2004-2005. Richard W. Johns and Linda Y. Kelso of Foley & Lardner were named to the 2005 BTI Client Service All-Star Team for Law Firms. H. Phillip Yorston of Public Support Services at the Property Appraiser’s Office in West Palm Beach was elected treasurer of the Florida Kiwanis District. Ryan Davis of Winderweedle, Haines, Ward & Woodman, P.A., was elected to the board of directors of the Central Florida Bankruptcy Law Association. Elaine Holmes of T. Elaine Holmes, P.A., in Tampa was elected president of the board of directors of WMNF Community Radio 88.5, owned by the Nathan B. Stubblefield Foundation. Robert R. Hendry of Hendry, Stoner, DeLancett & Brown, P.A., in Orlando was re-elected to the National Steering Committee of the District Export Councils. William R. Clayton of Greenberg Traurig in Ft. Lauderdale was elected a member of the American Board of Trial Advocates and the Ft. Lauderdale chapter of ABOTA. Randy Porcher of Gonzalez & Porcher, P.A., in Lake Worth received the 2004 Kennie Edwards Memorial Award from the workers’ compensation committee of the Palm Beach County Bar Association. Keisha Bell of Ft. Myers wrote her first novel, Emerging. . . Free, which was released in November 2004. The novel examines parental abandonment through the eyes of children. Gary A. Poliakoff of Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., was appointed to the drafting committee on the uniform common interest ownership housing for the National Conference of Commissioners of Uniform State Laws. Michael Rosenberg of Packman, Neuwahl & Rosenberg served as a co-chair and a speaker at the 23rd Annual International Tax Conference. Rosenberg’s speech was titled, “The Complexities when Dealing with the Qualified Domestic Trust U.S. Estate Tax Marital Deduction.” John J. Koresko V of Koresko & Associates was named to Pennsylvania Attorney General-Elect Tom Corbett’s transition team. Janice Matson Rickert and Fred Werdine of Fowler White Boggs Banker were selected to participate in the 2005 class of Leadership Tampa Bay. William Merlin, Jr., of The Merlin Law Group, P.A., in Tampa co-chaired the Sixth Annual Windstorm Insurance Conference. Merlin presented a workshop titled, “Unlicensed Practice of Law and Unlicensed Public Adjusting,” dealing with how adjusters, public adjusters, contractors, and others involved with a claim sometimes unknowingly engage in the unauthorized practice of law. Merlin also served on an expert panel discussion titled, “What We Learned for the 2004 Hurricanes.” Lizel Gonzalez of Legal Services of Greater Miami, Inc., received the “Outstanding Young Lawyer’s Award” awarded by the Cuba American Bar Association. James A. Martin, Jr., of MacFarlane, Ferguson & McMullen was named president-elect of the Florida Academy of Healthcare Attorneys. Martin will assume the presidency in 2006. Patrick O’Connor of Steel, Hector & Davis, L.L.P., in Miami was elected to the board of directors of the Greater Miami Service Corps. Fred Karlinsky of Colodny, Fass, Talenfeld, Karlinsky & Abate in Ft. Lauderdale discussed surplus lines insurance, distribution systems, and emerging insurance issues in the U.S. at an insurance seminar series in London and Norwich, England sponsored by the North American Training Alliance. Ray Gudur of Naples was a guest speaker on, “Bioethics and the Law” at International College. He also was invited to teach an online course in employment law for Devry University. Scott A. Fisher of Fowler White Boggs Banker in Tampa was recently elected to the board of directors of Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Pinellas County. Dinita L. James of Ford & Harrison in Tampa was recognized by the Hillsborough Association for Women Lawyers as a “Lawyer in the Spotlight.” Additionally, James received the ABA Litigation Section’s Award of Excellence. Douglas J. Chumbley of Carlton Fields was the recipient of the Florida Defense Lawyers Association 2004 CLE Award. Michael P. Brundage of Hill, Ward & Henderson, P.A., in Tampa was nationally certified in business bankruptcy law by the American Board of Certification. Mitchell J. Panter of Panter, Panter & Sampedro in Miami was a speaker at a seminar sponsored by the National Business Institute. Panter’s topic was, “Keys to Successful Pre-Trial Preparation in Florida.” Joan Nelson Hook of New Port Richey attended the “Unprogram” presented by the Academy of Florida Elder Law Attorneys. Additionally, Hook spoke at the meeting of the North Suncoast Estate Planning Council. The program was titled, “Medicaid is Not for Dummies.” Kathleen S. McLeroy of Carlton Fields in Tampa was honored by the University of Tampa Alumni Association with the University Service and Recognition Award. McLeroy also was reappointed to the Bay Area Legal Services, Inc., and was elected treasurer 2005. Betsy E. Gallagher of Cole, Scott & Kissane, P.A., spoke on “Presenting the Record on Appeal” at the Florida Defense Lawyers Association Young Lawyers’ Seminar. Scott A. Cole and Barry A. Postman of Cole, Scott, Kissane, P.A., spoke on admissibility of evidence and expert testimony to the members of the National Business Institute. Faith Gay of White & Case, L.L.P., and John Grundhauser of Dunwody, White & Landon, P.A., were elected new members of the Dade Community Foundation’s board of governors. Robert A. Christaldi of de la Parte & Gilbert, P.A., in Tampa was selected to serve on the board of directors of The Tampa Club. Christaldi was also re-elected to serve an additional term on the board of directors of CreativeTampaBay, Inc. Cathryn A. Mitchell of MillerMitchell, P.C., was recently appointed president and secretary to the Princeton Bar Association’s board of trustees. Terence Delahunty, Jr., of Foley & Lardner, L.L.P., in Orlando was named to the board of governors of the Orlando Regional Chamber of Commerce. Luis Viera of Abbey, Adams, Byelick, Kiernan, Mueller & Lancaster, L.L.P., in St. Pete was elected to the Hillsborough Association of Retarded Citizens board. Joshua Markus of Carlton Fields was elected by the ABA’s board of governors to serve as the ABA’s representative to the Council of the Inter-American Bar Association. Jeffrey Michael Cohen of Carlton Fields served as a faculty member for the 33 rd A nnual National Session of the National Institute for Trial Advocacy. Cynthia Crofoot Rignanese and J. Lenora Bressler of the Law Offices of J. Kelly, Kennedy in Winter Haven, presented a live, call-in radio show on “Laws You Need to Know Following the Hurricanes” on radio show Florida Talks AM 1570. Erik P. Kimball of Akerman Senterfitt in Orlando was elected to the board of governors of the National Federation of Municipal Analysts. Kimberly Kolback moderated the panel, “Sports Licensing 2004” during the 16 th A nnual Southern Regional Entertainment and Sports Law Seminar. Susan Fleming Bennett of Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson, P.A., was chosen as one of the recipients of the 2004 Networking Award by the Commercial Real Estate Women Tampa Bay. Greg Barnhart of Searcy, Denney, Scarola, Barnhart & Shipley, P.A., in West Palm Beach was elected secretary of 1000 Friends of Florida, for which Barnhart has served of the board of directors since 1997. Norman Elliott Kent of Ft. Lauderdale of Kent & Cormican received the “Community Role Model” award by the Sawgrass Mills Corporation. Edward H. Davis, Jr., of Astigarraga Davis in Miami was appointed chair emeritus of the International Litigation and Arbitration Committee and as the liaison between the International Bar Association and the bars of Trinidad and Tobago and Guatemala. Francis B. Geary, Jr. , of Fowler White Boggs Banker in West Palm Beach was selected to participate in the 2005 class of Leadership West Palm Beach. H. Scott Fingerhut of Miami was appointed to the board of directors for Legal Services of Greater Miami and the South Florida Mental Health Association. H. Jacey Kaps of Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell in Miami spoke at seminars sponsored by Sterling Educational Services. His presentations covered issues concerning water intrusion and mold claims. Steven R. Bechtel of Mateer Harbert in Orlando was appointed to the Florida Supreme Court’s Committee on Arts in the Court. Roland Sanchez-Medina, Jr., of Miami was re-elected to the Board of Directors of the Cuban-American Bar Association, Inc.last_img read more


PPP loan forgiveness rules for lenders, borrowers released


first_img continue reading » The Small Business Administration (SBA) issued two interim final rules (IFRs) providing paycheck protection program (PPP) borrowers and lenders with additional information on loan forgiveness and the loan review process. The agency previously released the loan forgiveness application for borrowers; NAFCU has consistently sought additional guidance for lenders on the issue.Key things for credit unions to know from the IFR on loan forgiveness:Application: In order to receive loan forgiveness, borrowers must complete the loan forgiveness application (Form 3508) and submit it to their lender. Lenders then have 60 days from receipt of a complete loan forgiveness application to issue a decision to the SBA; lenders are also responsible for notifying borrowers of loan forgiveness amounts. The SBA will remit payment to the lender no later than 90 days after the lender makes a decision. If only a portion of the loan is forgiven and a balance remains, the borrower must repay on or before the two year maturity. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


Arsenal must take a gamble and back Mikel Arteta in the transfer market, says Ray Parlour


first_imgAdvertisement Metro Sport ReporterSunday 28 Jun 2020 11:21 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link385Shares Advertisement Mikel Arteta is having a difficult time as Arsenal manager (Picture: Getty Images)Arsenal legend Ray Parlour has called on the club’s board to back Mikel Arteta in the transfer market and take a gamble in the hope of returning to the Champions League.The Gunners have struggled since the Premier League restart, losing to Manchester City and Brighton, although they did return to winning ways against Southampton on Thursday.Hopes of a return to the Champions League next season are slim, with Arsenal ninth in the table and nine points behind Wolves in fifth place.Parlour believes that his former club are in something of a downward spiral and it needs to be brought to a halt by spending money over the summer.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTThe England international feels Arteta is proving himself to be a good manager, but he needs the support of the club to make a success of the job.‘Arsenal need to get back into the Champions League by spending more money and taking more of a gamble as a club,’ said Parlour.‘Arteta has done everything right so far, but now it is up to the club to back him.‘The lower you get and the more ambition the other teams get then it is going to be difficult for Arsenal to challenge again.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityArsenal confirmed a contract extension for David Luiz last week, keeping the defender at the club until the end of next season and Parlour believes this proves a lack of ambition from the board as the Brazilian is not up to the required standard.‘He makes too many mistakes and at 33 he is not going to learn,’ Parlour continued. ‘You have to look a little bit higher than David Luiz.‘He could be a squad player and you could play him as a holding midfielder.‘He has got a range of passing and you know if you make a mistakes there you have centre-halves behind you, that could be a role for him.’Arsenal are in FA Cup action on Sunday, taking on Sheffield United in the quarter-finals at Bramall Lane.MORE: Chelsea handed Ben Chilwell boost as Ajax confirm Arsenal transfer target can goMORE: David Luiz took huge pay cut so Arsenal could complete Pablo Mari & Cedric Soares transfersFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page.center_img Comment Arsenal must take a gamble and back Mikel Arteta in the transfer market, says Ray Parlourlast_img read more


Holder outshines Blackwood, Russell in Tridents consolation win


first_imgTAROUBA, Trinidad, (CMC) – Captain Jason Holder lashed a tantalising half-century as deposed champions Barbados Tridents ended an otherwise dismal campaign on a high note, when they brushed aside Jamaica Tallawahs by seven wickets here Saturday.Already eliminated thanks to six defeats in their previous nine outings, Tridents played with confidence to chase down a tricky 162 at the Brian Lara Stadium, reaching their target with 10 balls to spare.Holder shone with 69 off 42 balls, slamming nine fours and three sixes to pull his side around from a dodgy position of 17 for two in the second over.When he perished in the 13th over, Tridents were still well short of victory but left-hander Jonathan Carter, promoted to open, struck an unbeaten 42 while New Zealander Mitchell Santner continued his good form with a cameo unbeaten 35 to see their side home.Earlier, Jermaine Blackwood carved out a stroke-filled 74 and Andre Russell blasted 54 as Tallawahs reached 161 for four off their 20 overs after opting to bat first.Blackwood provided Tallawahs – already qualified for the semi-finals – with an explosive start, stroking five fours and four sixes in a 69-ball knock.More importantly he inspired an opening stand of 51 with Glenn Phillips (17) and also added 38 for the second with Asif Ali who made five.Phillips was removed in the eighth over by a brilliant catch at deep cover by Keon Harding off left-arm spinner Joshua Bishop and Asif edged a cut behind off leg-spinner Hayden Walsh in the 13th over at 89 for two but Russell arrived to keep the tempo going.He put on a further 37 for the third wicket with Blackwood before dominating a 35-run stand with Rovman Powell (five not out).All told, Russell pummeled four fours and five sixes to mark his third half-century of the tournament before falling to the penultimate ball of the innings, stumped off leg-spinner Rashid Khan.When Johnson Charles chopped on the first legitimate delivery of the innings from speedster Oshane Thomas following two wides, Tridents once again appeared destined for a miserable showing.And Shamarh Brooks’s dismissal in the next over, bowled by a beauty from left-arm seamer Preston McSween for five, only seemed to confirm those fears.But Holder took the game away from Tallawahs with a brilliant counter-attack, adding a precious 90 for the third wicket with Carter, who struck four fours in a patient 44-ball innings.Leg-spinner Sandeep Lamichhane gained a fortunate lbw verdict against the free-hitting Holder but any hopes of a Tallawahs comeback were then ended as Carter and Santner posted 58 in an unbroken fourth wicket stand.The left-handed Santner in particular took the sting out of Tallawahs, belting three fours and two sixes in a sparkling 21-ball cameo, ending the contest by launching seamer Carlos Brathwaite over long on for six.last_img read more


Clippers escape with victory against stubborn Spurs


first_imgThe Clippers’ hard-charging Montrezl Harrell drew a foul, but he missed both free throws, after which Spurs forward LaMarcus Aldridge made a pair to tie the score at 107.When a 3-pointer from Williams, his team’s most clutch contributor, splashed through with 41.4 seconds left, the Clippers led for good at 110-107. It was the third consecutive game that Williams came through with the key shot down the stretch; he also had the game-winning baskets in overtime against the Milwaukee Bucks and Warriors.“I don’t process it like that,” Williams said. “I just think it’s we’re in a good space right now, collectively. That’s how I process it. I don’t get really wrapped up in what I’m doing.”The Spurs – so, so stubborn – cut the margin to one point when a DeRozen drive made it 110-109 with 36 seconds left.But Gallinari, all but automatic from the free-throw line, converted four foul shots to give the Clippers an advantage that held up despite DeRozan’s final dunk with 8.7 seconds left. Two more free throws by Williams and the credits could roll on the Clippers’ third consecutive victory. Sing it, rooks!One more time: Happy birthday, @Sin_City_803. pic.twitter.com/poClET2s6b— LA Clippers (@LAClippers) November 16, 2018 Lou Williams tallies 23 PTS (9 in the 4th) off the bench in the @LAClippers home victory! #ClipperNation pic.twitter.com/U3XG1XKJGK— NBA (@NBA) November 16, 2018 “It was really a strange game,” Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. “Either team who plays defense in the fourth would win the game. This was a gritty win tonight.“Like I said before the year, we’re gonna have a lot of these games, and it’s been true,” Rivers added. “Every game feels like tonight, and so if we have a lot of them, and keep winning them or even if you lose some of them, you’re going to keep learning and you won’t have as many. But it’s a process.”The Clippers (9-5) were led by Williams (23 points) Tobias Harris (whose 18 points accounted for his 14th consecutive game scoring at least 15 points) and Danilo Gallinari (19).Off the bench, Harrell added 14, and Tyrone Wallace and Sindarius Thornwell (who turned 24 on Thursday) contributed defensive effort.DeRozan – an L.A. native who played for USC – turned in a masterful performance: He scored a game-high 34 points on 14-for-30 shooting – and even earned a couple foul calls with some exaggerated reactions.After a quiet first half in which he found himself in foul trouble for the first time, Gilgeous-Alexander took some time to get involved offensively, scoring all nine of his points in the second half.The Clippers finished 28 for 35 from the free-throw line, including shooting 17 for 19 from the stripe in the first half.Nonetheless, the Clippers’ trouble sustaining separation started early.They led 44-30 on Wallace’s layup with 7:37 left in the second quarter, but looked up five minutes later and found themselves trailing 53-52. The Spurs (7-7) scored 30 points in that last 7:30 in part by capitalizing on Clippers’ mistakes – they scored 12 points on six first-half turnovers – to erase that second-quarter 14-point advantage.“San Antonio is not a team that wants to run, but we kept giving them live ball turnovers which allowed them to get easy baskets,” Rivers said. “And they’re too efficient to give them easy baskets and we did that.Harris (14), Gallinari (12) and Williams (10) all had double-digit point totals in the first half.Next up for the Clippers, who are 2-4 on the road: a three-game trip to Brooklyn, Atlanta and Washington.“We’re a good basketball team despite whatever people were talking about,” Williams said. “We always felt we were a good basketball team. We’re not surprised. We’re playing up to the level that we thought we would be.”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error PreviousThe Clippers’ Tobias Harris looks to pass while the Spurs’ LaMarcus Aldridge defends during the first half of Thursday’s game at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)San Antonio Spurs guard DeMar DeRozan, left, drives to the basket past Los Angeles Clippers forward Tobias Harris during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe Clippers’ Montrezl Harrell goes to the basket as the Spurs’ Davis Bertans tries to defend during the first half of Thursday’s game at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)The Clippers’ Montrezl Harrell celebrates after dunking during the first half of Thursday’s game against the Spurs at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)San Antonio Spurs guard Patty Mills, left, drives around Los Angeles Clippers forward Mike Scott during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Lou Williams #23 of the Los Angeles Clippers dribbles past Patty Mills #8 of the San Antonio Spurs during the first half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander #2 of the Los Angeles Clippers dribbles into Marco Belinelli #18 of the San Antonio Spurs during the first half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Clippers guard Tyrone Wallace blocks a shot by San Antonio Spurs guard Bryn Forbes during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)Los Angeles Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari blocks a shot by San Antonio Spurs guard DeMar DeRozan during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Patrick Beverley #21 of the Los Angeles Clippers battles Patty Mills #8 of the San Antonio Spurs for a loose ball during the first half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Dante Cunningham #33 of the San Antonio Spurs blocks a shot by Danilo Gallinari #8 of the Los Angeles Clippers during the first half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)San Antonio Spurs guard DeMar DeRozan tries to steal the ball from Los Angeles Clippers forward Tobias Harris during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Patty Mills #8 and Rudy Gay #22 of the San Antonio Spurs defends against Danilo Gallinari #8 of the Los Angeles Clippers during the first half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Rudy Gay #22 of the San Antonio Spurs defends against Danilo Gallinari #8 of the Los Angeles Clippers during the first half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Derrick White #4 and Davis Bertans #42 of the San Antonio Spurs defend against Montrezl Harrell #5 of the Los Angeles Clippers during the first half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Clippers guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander reacts with coach Doc Rivers after being called for a foul during the second half of the team’s NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. The Clippers won 116-111. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: LaMarcus Aldridge #12 of the San Antonio Spurs battles Tobias Harris #34 of the Los Angeles Clippers for a rebound during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Marcin Gortat #13 and Tobias Harris #34 of the Los Angeles Clippers rebound past LaMarcus Aldridge #12 of the San Antonio Spurs during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: DeMar DeRozan #10 of the San Antonio Spurs is unable to reach a loose ball before it goes out of bounds as Montrezl Harrell #5 of the Los Angeles Clippers looks on during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: DeMar DeRozan #10 of the San Antonio Spurs shoots over the defense of Tobias Harris #34 of the Los Angeles Clippers during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Patty Mills #8 of the San Antonio Spurs dribbles past Shai Gilgeous-Alexander #2 of the Los Angeles Clippers during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: LaMarcus Aldridge #12 of the San Antonio Spurs battles Mike Scott #30 of the Los Angeles Clippers for a loose ball during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)The Clippers’ Lou Williams shoots between the defense of the Spurs’ Bryn Forbes, left, and Davis Bertans during the first half of Thursday’s game at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Clippers guard Shai Gilgeous-Alexander shoots over San Antonio Spurs guard Patty Mills during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. The Clippers won 116-111. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)Los Angeles Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari shoots over San Antonio Spurs guard Patty Mills during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. The Clippers won 116-111. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)San Antonio Spurs guard Marco Belinelli, right, fouls Los Angeles Clippers forward Montrezl Harrell during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. The Clippers won 116-111. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)Los Angeles Clippers guard Lou Williams, left, shoots past San Antonio Spurs center Jakob Poeltl during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. The Clippers won 116-111. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Patrick Beverley #21 of the Los Angeles Clippers blocks a shot by Bryn Forbes #11 of the San Antonio Spurs during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)Los Angeles Clippers forward Danilo Gallinari pleads after getting being called for a foul by referee Derrick Collins during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the San Antonio Spurs in Los Angeles, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. The Clippers won 116-111. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Jakob Poeltl #25 of the San Antonio Spurs shoots over Montrezl Harrell #5 of the Los Angeles Clippers during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Mike Scott #30 of the Los Angeles Clippers grapples with Rudy Gay #22 of the San Antonio Spurs during the first half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Patrick Beverley #21 of the Los Angeles Clippers reacts to making a shot during the second half of a game against the San Antonio Spurs at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: DeMar DeRozan #10 of the San Antonio Spurs holds his face against the San Antonio Spurs Patrick Beverley #21 of the Los Angeles Clippers looks on during the second half of a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 15: Bryn Forbes #11 of the San Antonio Spurs reacts to losing to the Los Angeles Clippers 116-111 in a game at Staples Center on November 15, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)The Clippers’ Montrezl Harrell celebrates after a basket during the second half of Thursday’s victory as the Spurs’ LaMarcus Aldridge (12) looks on. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)The Clippers’ Tobias Harris looks to pass while the Spurs’ LaMarcus Aldridge defends during the first half of Thursday’s game at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 35The Clippers’ Tobias Harris looks to pass while the Spurs’ LaMarcus Aldridge defends during the first half of Thursday’s game at Staples Center. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)ExpandLOS ANGELES — The Clippers’ 116-111 victory over the San Antonio Spurs on Thursday might not have been the must-see TV event that Monday’s overtime victory over the Golden State Warriors was, but it showcased the grit the Clippers are so proud of.Thursday’s game, which aired on TNT, was one of only three Clippers contests televised nationally on a channel other than NBA TV this season, offering cable TV viewers a rare glimpse to see a team that has been written about so much lately in national publications, including a report this week in the New York Times.The audience tuning in saw a depleted but stubborn Spurs team frustrate the home team for most of the evening, as the Clippers’ lead yo-yo’d throughout the night, including down the stretch. A 10-point fourth-quarter advantage was whittled to 99-98 with five minutes left and the teams went on to exchange shots down the stretch.Clippers rookie Shai Gilgeous-Alexander’s jump shot made it 101-98. Then new Spur DeMar DeRozan drove for a layup. Gilgeous-Alexander hit another jumper. The Clippers’ Lou Williams drained a shot. San Antonio’s Bryn Forbes made a 3-pointer. And it was 107-105.last_img read more


Amel Tuka qualified for the World Championship!


first_imgAmel Tuka celebrated at the 800-meter race at the athletics rally in Ostrava.In the Czech Republic at the rally The Golden Spike, Tuka celebrated with time 1: 44.95, which is the best result this season.However, what is even more important than winning is that he has thus complied with the World Championship (1: 45.80) standard that will be held in late September and early October in Doha.Second place was given to Polish Adam Kszczotu (1: 45.63), while third place was won by Alfred Kipketer (1: 45.90), Klix.ba news portal reports.last_img