Month: July 2019


New funding of more than £15 million is set to de


first_imgNew funding of more than £1.5 million is set to deliver an international extension to a disability arts commissioning programme that grew out of London 2012, and help influence how disabled people are perceived in other countries.Unlimited has secured more than £750,000 from Arts Council England – which will be matched by the British Council – to extend its work internationally.The new Unlimited International programme will make six research and development awards to disabled artists, and then select three of them to become full commissions, each led by disabled artists from England and one other country.The completed works are set to tour at least three countries, which are likely to include Brazil, Australia and Japan, as well as in Europe.The new scheme – which will be overseen by the disability-led arts organisation Shape Arts and arts producing experts Arts Admin – aims to help disabled artists from other countries improve their skills.But it also aims to shift perceptions of disabled people, and build on Unlimited’s existing work to ensure disabled artists have the same opportunities as non-disabled artists, “embedding” them within the cultural sector.Unlimited was built on a successful programme which saw 29 pieces by disabled artists showcased during the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad.In the lead-up to the commissioning process, disabled artists from Brazil, Japan and Australia will tour Britain, probably appearing at Unlimited festivals at London’s Southbank Centre and Glasgow’s Tramway, and other venues across the country.The tour will also be supported by the British Council; the Pallant House art gallery in West Sussex; the disability, music and technology charity Drake Music; and the Watershed arts centre in Bristol.Tony Heaton, chief executive of Shape, told Disability News Service: “It’s a great achievement that Shape and Unlimited are now working globally and as far-reaching as Brazil, Australia and Japan.“We in the UK should be very proud that the home-grown disability arts movement that started a quarter century ago is having such a huge impact in 2016, and the international presence of disabled artists will help further our mission to make art accessible for all.“However, we recognise that rapid growth requires a more complex infrastructure and greater resources, so the ongoing support from funders is vital for us to continue our work.”Joyce Wilson, London area director for Arts Council England, said: “Unlimited continues to respond to the very high demand for ambitious new work by Deaf and disabled artists.“The commissioned works and associated Southbank Unlimited Festival are proving instrumental in shifting the attitudes of not only venues, programmers and producers but also audiences.“Unlimited International offers significant scope to grow this impact worldwide, delivering demonstrable change and extending the international profile of British Deaf and disabled artists.”Picture: A previous Unlimited commission: Liz Carr’s ‘Assisted Suicide: The Musical’last_img read more


The government is refusing to act over claims that


first_imgThe government is refusing to act over claims that a primary school excluded up to 30 pupils – many of them disabled – to smooth its path to becoming a self-governing “academy”. Nonsuch primary in Birmingham moved from local authority control to become an academy in January, but now faces allegations that it excluded pupils in order to improve its performance and so make the move to academy status easier.At the time of its last Ofsted report, in 2012, the school (pictured) had just 193 children between the ages of four and 11, so it may have excluded more than 15 per cent of its students in a bid to become an academy.The council has admitted that 90 per cent of fixed-term – temporary – exclusions from the school in the 2014-15 academic year were children with special educational needs (SEN).The trust that now runs the school, the Barchelai Academy Trust, has launched an independent investigation into the way Nonsuch treats pupils with SEN.Cllr John Lines, a Conservative city councillor whose ward includes the school and who has played a key role in exposing the exclusions, said he believed Nonsuch primary had been engaged in a “dash for cash and academy status”, and branded its actions “an utter disgrace”.He has collected the names and addresses of about 30 pupils who have been excluded either temporarily or permanently from the school over the last 18 months, and said he had seen many of their parents in tears over what had happened.He said: “I have been on the council for 33 years and I have never experienced anything quite like it.“Some of the disabled children are still not receiving an education. It is discrimination of the worst kind.”He has written to the education secretary, Nicky Morgan, and Ofsted, about his concerns.And he said he did not care if raising these concerns made him unpopular within his own party.Morgan said in a white paper published last month that the government wanted every school to be an academy – and therefore outside direct local authority control – by 2022.Cllr Lines said: “All I care about is that my constituents’ children get a good education. If that makes me unpopular with my own party, I don’t give a damn.”But he also criticised Labour-run Birmingham City Council for failing to act on the exclusions when the school was still under local authority control.He said: “The education department in Birmingham abandoned these children, many of them disabled, to their fate.“Now they say they can’t do anything about it because it’s an academy. But it wasn’t an academy when this was going on.”Peter French, Barchelai’s chair, admitted that there had “clearly been issues at that school” around the way it dealt with disabled pupils – before the trust took over in January – and suggested that “some of the paperwork and processes were not done as well as they could have been done”.But he said it was “not true at all” that the school had carried out the exclusions to smooth its path to becoming an academy, although he conceded that the investigation would look at those claims.French said that no children had been excluded since the trust took over in January.And he said the trust had installed a new SEN co-ordinator to “try to make sure all the proper procedures are being done and the appropriate support is put in there”.He said: “My view as chair of the trust is we want to have an inclusive school there.“We want to do our best to ensure we cater for all children as best we can.”A Birmingham City Council spokeswoman said there had been less than five permanent exclusions from Nonsuch in each of the last two academic years, 2013-14 and 2014-15.But she revealed that the number of temporary exclusions at the school had risen from fewer than five in 2013-14 to 10 in 2014-15, while nine of those 10 had “some type of SEN”.There are no figures for the school’s final term before it became an academy.The council spokeswoman said: “We take these claims very seriously and are working closely with Nonsuch Primary School, its academy trust and the Regional Schools Commissioner, to review the inclusion processes and procedures for all pupils.”The Regional Schools Commissioner for the West Midlands, Pank Patel, had failed to comment by noon today (7 April).Inclusive education campaigners have been warning since at least 2010 that the rapid spread of “academy” schools was undermining the inclusion of disabled children in mainstream education.A Department for Education spokeswoman said: “We are clear that no school should discriminate against pupils – and they have a legal duty not to.“All schools are held to account by Ofsted for their use of exclusion powers.“Barchelai Trust has reviewed the running of the academy and is now taking swift action so the needs of all pupils are met and underachievement is overcome.“We will continue to monitor the situation.”When asked if ministers were taking any action to ensure that such discrimination did not happen to other disabled children as a result of government plans to turn every school into an academy, she declined to comment further.An Ofsted spokesman said his organisation did not discuss individual complaints about schools, but said in a statement: “Inspectors ask for information about pupil exclusions when they go into schools.“Inspectors assess their use of exclusion, including the rates, patterns and reasons, as well as any differences between groups of pupils.“If there is evidence of a school using exclusion powers inappropriately then an inspection may be brought forward.”last_img read more


ENGLAND Academy coach Dave Elliott has named his 1


first_imgENGLAND Academy coach Dave Elliott has named his 17-man squad to take on the Australian Schoolboys in the first of a two-test series at Canberra’s Bruce Stadium on Sunday August 5.Elliott’s charges have recorded back-to-back victories over New South Wales and Parramatta Juniors in their warm-up games on tour so far and they go into Sunday’s clash hoping to take the first step towards successive series victories over the Schoolboys.“We’ve got a very strong squad available to us all the way through and that has made selection very difficult this week,” said Elliott. “We’ve had some standout performances in our games on tour so far and every player in the squad has staked a claim to play against Australia.“We have some disappointed players in the squad today but I’m confident that we have selected a squad that can come away with the win on Sunday.”England Academy side to play Australian Schoolboys (professional and community clubs):1, Lewis Tierney (Wigan Warriors, Wigan St Pats)2, James Saltonstall (Warrington Wolves, Siddal)3, Luke Briscoe (Leeds Rhinos, Featherstone Lions)4, John Ford (Salford City Reds, Blackbrook Royals)5, Joe Burgess (Wigan Warriors, Ince Rose Bridge)6, Ryan Hampshire (Wigan Warriors, Normanton Knights)7, George Williams (Wigan Warriors, Ince Rose Bridge)8, Liam McAvoy (Bradford Bulls, Broughton Red Rose)9, Dominic Speakman (St Helens, Halton Hornets)10, Gavin Bennion (Warrington Wolves, Ryland Sharks)11, John Bateman (Bradford Bulls, Dudley Hill)12, Connor Farrell (Wigan Warriors, Wigan St Pats)13, Ben Currie (Warrington Wolves, Parkside Golbourn)14, Luke Thompson (St Helens, Pilkington Recs)15, Ryan Sutton (Wigan Warriors, Wigan St Pats)16, Jordan Baldwinson (Leeds Rhinos, Hunslet Warriors)17, Josh Johnson (Huddersfield Giants, Saddleworth)Live updates from England Academy’s game against Australian Schoolboys can be seen by following the official England twitter account @england_rllast_img read more


THE Heritage Alcove situated in the Saints Supers


first_imgTHE Heritage Alcove, situated in the Saints Superstore at Langtree Stadium, features a display that commemorates the links between the Club and those who have represented their country in the armed forces.Pride of place is the Lancashire County jersey belonging to Jimmy Flanagan who was killed in action in France in May 1918.Amongst the other memorabilia are several soldiers’ helmets from the First World War, lent by Peter Butterworth, whose painting, the Fallen Five, is also on show.This marvellous artwork is a lasting memorial to those Saints’ players who fell in the First World War – Jim Flanagan, James Ford, Jimmy Greenwood, George Sephton and Hubert Sidney ‘Jum’ Turtill from New Zealand.Paul Clough’s signed match-worn jersey from the Hull KR match, auctioned in aid of ABF The Soldiers’ Charity is also displayed.The display was opened by Chairman Eamonn McManus, whose father was a prisoner of war in the Far East during World War Two.Also in attendance were artist Peter Butterworth, Jimmy Flanagan, grandson of the great Saints’ and Lancashire winger, Dave Dooley, who wrote a poem in his book Saints Verses about the Fallen Five and Saints’ Community Development Director Gordon Pennington, who is a former RAF officer with more than 20 years service.”last_img read more




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