Tag: Caiden


Womens access to reproductive health care critical to ending poverty UN reports


The report, People, Poverty and Possibilities: Making Development Work for the Poor, contends that reducing the gender gap in health and education can significantly reduce personal and household poverty and generate national economic growth.Reproductive health problems are among the main insecurities associated with poverty, according to the report, which notes that poor women have more unwanted children since they lack access to reproductive health services and information. At the same time, gender inequality often deprives women of the ability to refuse risky practices, keeps women uninformed about prevention, and puts them last in line for care and life-saving treatment. The report calls for greater investments in universal health care and women’s education, noting that schooling for mothers has been proven to contribute more to reducing the rate of child malnutrition than improvements in food availability. Closing the gender gap in education also helps women to reduce fertility and improves child survival. In countries where girls are only half as likely to go to school as boys, there are on average 21.1 more infant deaths per 1,000 live births than in countries with no such gender gap, according to the study.Speaking at the report’s launch in New York, Jeffrey Sachs, Secretary-General Kofi Annan’s Special Adviser on the UN Millennium Development Goals, said the report underscores the fact that women’s access to reproductive health services is not just a worthy goal on its own, “but an absolutely critical tool to alleviating poverty.”Reproductive health, family planning services and population policies feed into all of the Millennium Development Goals, which were set by world leaders at a UN summit meeting in 2000, Mr. Sachs said. The report shows how giving greater access to reproductive health services “is a central component of the overall struggle against poverty,” he said.Asked about the decision by the United States administration to cut off funding to UNFPA, Mr. Sachs said, “There is a growing recognition in American politics that poverty alleviation is actually part of a national security need and strategy for the United States and for other countries as well.” He voiced hope that the administration would “take a realistic view of what are the best ways to achieve poverty alleviation… and read this report.” read more


Missing Malaysian plane may have flown for 4 hours after losing contact


first_imgUS INVESTIGATORS SUSPECT the missing Malaysian airliner was in the air for four hours after its last confirmed contact, and may have been diverted to an unknown location.The Wall Street Journal said US aviation investigators and national security officials are basing their theory on data automatically downloaded and sent to the ground from the Boeing 777′s Rolls-Royce engines, which suggested the plane flew for a total of five hours.The WSJ attributed the information to two unidentified sources “familiar with the details”. Rolls-Royce in Singapore said it could not comment on an ongoing investigation.“We continue to monitor the situation and offer our support to Malaysia Airlines,” the British engine maker said in a statement from Singapore.The report could mean that the Malaysia Airlines flight, which had 239 people on board, travelled for hundreds of miles after its last contact with air traffic control at around 1:30 am Saturday (5:30pm GMT Friday) about an hour after takeoff from Kuala Lumpur en route to Beijing.Philippine crew members search over the South China Sea for the missing plane. (AP Photo)Search teams are already covering a huge area comprising 27,000 nautical miles (more than 90,000 square kilometres), from the South China Sea to the waters west of Malaysia.Malaysian investigators have made clear that they are still considering hijacking as one of their lines of inquiry and the CIA has not ruled out a terror link.Theories“US counterterrorism officials are pursuing the possibility that a pilot or someone else on board the plane may have diverted it toward an undisclosed location after intentionally turning off the jetliner’s transponders to avoid radar detection,” the WSJ reported, citing “one person tracking the probe”.It went on to say that the uncertainty over the plane’s course and why its transponders were not working “has raised theories among investigators that the aircraft may have been commandeered for a reason that appears unclear to US authorities”.Indonesian Air Force officers look at a map of the Malacca Strait during a briefing about the search operation. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) Officials had been told that investigators were pursuing the theory that the plane was diverted “with the intention of using it later for another purpose”, the WSJ quoted one source as saying.New Scientist magazine also reported that Rolls-Royce had received “at least two bursts of technical data” from flight MH370 at its British monitoring centre in Derby, which keeps a real-time track of its engines in use on civilian aircraft around the world.One of the data sets was sent on takeoff, the other during the climb towards Beijing, the magazine said on its website yesterday.It said the engine data was “filtered” from a larger report from the plane’s Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS) system — which puts out information about location and airspeed.Relatives of passengers wait for the latest news inside a hotel room set up for them in Beijing. (AP Photo/Andy Wong) Malaysia Airlines has said that all its aircraft are equipped with ACARS, but has said that “no information was relayed” by the system installed on flight MH370 and that there was no distress signal from the cockpit.Frustration over the shifting focus of the search and apparent lack of concrete information on the plane’s flight path has led to accusations of a chaotic and confused response by the Malaysian authorities and the airline.- © AFP, 2014Read: Satellite images of possible missing plane debris released by Chinese government > Read: Malaysia under fire over ‘chaotic’ search for missing jet >last_img read more