Tag: 苏州桑拿论坛


Why Khris Davis will DH for the A’s in the wild card game


first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.Khris Davis’ numbers for the 2019 season aren’t too fun to look at.His .220 average, .387 slugging percentage paired with a mere 23 home runs perhaps looks a little bleaker with his 2018 numbers posing as a backdrop. Davis’ year was a down one in its own right, but it hit a little different knowing the 48 home run, 123 RBI, .549 slugging percentage and .874 OPS in 2018 might’ve been his ceiling instead of his floor.Gr …last_img


Where Did Humans Learn Geometry?


first_imgIn Plato’s dialogue Meno, Socrates illustrated his view that certain foundations of knowledge are innate rather than learned.1  He took an untutored slave boy and, with a series of sketches in the sand, got the boy to deduce the Pythagorean Theorem by his own reasoning (see Encarta).    In a modern version, Harvard scientists found that basic concepts of geometry are understood by untutored tribespeople of the Amazon rainforest.  LiveScience reports:While high school freshmen sometimes struggle with parallelograms and the Pythagorean Theorem, people deep in the Amazon quickly grasp some basic concepts of geometry.    Although these indigenous tribes had never seen a protractor, compass, or even a ruler, a new study found they understood parallelism and right angles and can use distance, angles, and other relationships in maps to locate hidden objects.    The finding suggests all humans, regardless of language or schooling, possess a core set of geometrical intuitions. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Their research was published in Science.2  The authors referred to the Meno story at the end of their paper, feeling they had done Socrates one better – because his slave boy already possessed Greek language and familiarity with lines and shapes, and their Amazonian tribe did not.  The researchers did not speculate, however, on how this uniquely human capability evolved:Our experiments, in contrast [to Socrates], provide evidence that geometrical knowledge arises in humans independently of instruction, experience with maps or measurement devices, or mastery of a sophisticated geometrical language.  This conclusion is consistent with paleoanthropological evidence and with previous demonstrations of a right-hemisphere competence for nonverbal tests of geometry in split-brain patients.  Further research is needed to establish to what extent this core knowledge is shared with other animal species and whether it is available even in infancy or is acquired progressively during the first years of life.  There is little doubt that geometrical knowledge can be substantially enriched by cultural inventions such as maps, mathematical tools, or the geometrical terms of language.  Beneath this fringe of cultural variability, however, the spontaneous understanding of geometrical concepts and maps by this remote human community provides evidence that core geometrical knowledge, like basic arithmetic, is a universal constituent of the human mind. Constance Holden in Science3 also wrote up this story about possible “cognitive universals” but mentioned a couple of skeptics who think interpretation of the results is difficult.  Even so, they seem to point to at least a “general reasoning ability” that has only been demonstrated in humans.  Cognitive neuropsychologists are very interested in the study.1In Socratic philosophy, Truth (with a capital T) was self-existent, and was intuitively known – merely recalled – by humans, not learned by experience.  Socrates argued against the world of flux portrayed by Heraclitus, who taught that a man could never step in the same river twice.  To Socrates and Plato, by contrast, experience could only speak of material objects, not abstractions or concepts.  Material objects may be in a state of flux but Truth is eternal.2Dahaene et al., “Core Knowledge of Geometry in an Amazonian Indigene Group,” Science, 20 January 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5759, pp. 381 – 384, DOI: 10.1126/science.1121739.3Constance Holden, “Hunter-Gatherers Grasp Geometry,” Science, 20 January 2006: Vol. 311. no. 5759, p. 317, DOI: 10.1126/science.311.5759.317aPythagoras, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, the Stoics and many other great thinkers in the classical world – probably the majority of the famous philosophers (Democritus and Lucretius being exceptions) – believed in intelligent design.  They were non-evangelical, pagan philosophers to whom the intrinsic order and design of the universe and life was self-evident.  Their concepts of the Designer differed, but they all pointed to design as coming from an intelligent source.    Most of the classical philosophers were also absolutists.  They believed that outside of the mind of man there existed an unchanging truth beyond the mere objects accessible to the senses.  Evolutionists will find little support for relativism and materialism among the ancients.  History does not support their contention that intelligent design is a conspiracy by evangelical Christians.  The burden of proof should be upon the modern sophists who claim geometry is an artifact of the mindless, materialistic process of natural selection.    So the stone-age indigenous peoples of the rain forest comprehend geometry.  Fascinating.  Tell us, Darwinists, how did this evolve?  Be sure to include your axioms.(Visited 42 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


New Volley Cast into the Grand Canyon Age Wars


first_img(Visited 27 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Age estimates for the Grand Canyon by secular geologists differ between 100,000 years to 70 million years.  Who are you going to believe?The latest applecart-upsetting estimate, published in Science by Rebecca. M. Flowers of the University of Colorado and K. A. Farley of Caltech, puts it at 70 million years – 12 times older than what they called the “prevailing view” of 5-6 million years (although another estimate of 17 million was proposed in 2008; see 4/10/2008, and even ages less than a million had been proposed earlier – see 11/30/2007, 7/22/2002, 5/31/2002).  Flowers and Farley based their estimate on helium content of apatite in the western Grand Canyon, an alleged proxy for temperature and exposure to air.  They recognized, though, the “puzzling array of data” that make dating difficult.While Science Daily seemed excited to announce that Grand Canyon is “old as the dinosaurs,”  the AAS news service Science Now says the new estimate is not likely to settle the controversy: “many researchers are skeptical, noting that it’s not clear whether these findings radically change current scenarios of how and when the iconic gorge was carved.”According to Science Now, Flowers realizes that the debate over the age of the canyon has raged for over 150 years: “If history were as simple as the popular view, the canyon’s origins wouldn’t continue to be a topic of hot debate,” she said.  Skeptics counter that the one measurement from apatite helium content “hardly closes the debate on the canyon’s age.”  There’s “a lot of evidence for a young Grand Canyon,” one said (thinking in terms of 6 million years or less).  Another critic who collected the same kind of data a couple of kilometers away and got far younger results calls the 70-million-year date “out in left field.”  The 2008 estimate of 17 million based on speleothems is also controversial.Becky Oskin at Live Science focused on the controversy, admitting that from the rim the canyon “looks young” (still assuming a few million years).  She quoted geologist Richard Young:“It really looks like they’re onto something, but it’s hard to make sense out of it,” said Young, a professor at the State University of New York in Geneseo. “It’s really good work and it’s really interesting, so obviously there’s something we’re missing in the story. I’m sure we’re going to be talking about it forever,” he said.Science Daily, though, echoing the U Colorado press release featuring home girl Rebecca Flowers, made the new (old) date look as good as possible.  Even so, the press release recognized the controversy, and hinted that Flowers might be partly right:Flowers said there is significant controversy among scientists over the age and evolution of the Grand Canyon.  A variety of data suggest that the Grand Canyon had a complicated history, and the entire modern canyon may not have been carved all at the same time. Different canyon segments may have evolved separately before coalescing into what visitors see today.Even so, there’s a huge time difference between 70 million and even 17 million years – a period during which mass extinctions and the rise of the Rocky Mountains are said to have occurred.  “I expect that our interpretation that the Grand Canyon formed some 70 million years ago is going to generate a fair amount of controversy, and I hope it will motivate more research to help solve this problem,” Flowers said, hinting that her study with Farley was almost intentionally put out as a challenge.New Scientist went over the top in its headline, “Dinosaurs might have once gazed into the Grand Canyon.”  Then again, they might not have.  Or, they might have just a few thousand years ago, if the creationists are right.  Reporter Joanna Carver appealed to readers’ imaginations: “Picture the scene. It’s late in the Cretaceous period, 70 million years ago. A group of dinosaurs have gathered at the rim of what will become known as the Grand Canyon. They’re gawping over the edge, just as humans will in millennia to come,” she limned. “That might not be complete fantasy.”  Then again, it might.This is why you should treat dates from geologists with a huge serving of laughing gas.  The colossal extremes of their estimates for this most famous earth feature clearly shows that they do not know what they are talking about.  They are the blind men and the elephant, looking at a tail and calling the elephant a rope, or looking at the tusk and calling the elephant a spear.  These same geologists consistently ignore evidence for a very recent, catastrophic carving of the canyon.There are two separate dating problems with Grand Canyon: the date the sediments were laid down, and the date the canyon was carved.  Creation geologists have given ample evidence why the canyon and its sediments are far younger than secular estimates.  Examples include the vast extent of strata, their flatness, the lack of fault lines extending part way up, entire epochs missing between strata with no sign of erosion, soft-sediment deformation extending through multiple sequences, and more (see 6/24/2009 commentary).  Why are these evidences completely ignored in the dating game?  Answer: they give young ages that support a catastrophic global flood.  Geologists shudder to give aid and comfort to creationists.Even if you are not ready to entertain a drastic reduction in the age of the earth, it’s enough for now to recognize from these articles that secular geologists are clueless about the age of the Grand Canyon.  Actually, they have clues, but are clueless about reading them.  Why trust what they conclude, when one of them said he’s sure they’ll be talking about this forever?  Do they deserve that kind of job security?last_img read more


Hizbul Mujahideen militants held after encounter


first_imgTwo local Hizbul Mujahideen militants, who escaped at the end of a day-long encounter in Kulgam’s Qazigund area on Tuesday, were arrested from two separate spots on Wednesday.A police official said combing operation in the Kund Nowbug area around the encounter site was resumed in the morning. A soldier and a militant were killed in the gun battle on Tuesday. A police official said a local militant, Aqib Iqbal Malik alias Talha Bhai, a resident of Ringet Noorabad, was arrested from the area. Malik, who joined militancy earlier this year, had been injured.Another militant, who is also believed to have fled from the encounter site in Kulgam, was apprehended as he was trying to board a train in the morning. He has been identified as Shams Waqar, said a police official.Meanwhile, the Army has identified the deceased soldier as sepoy Manjinder Singh. Singh, 22, joined the army in 2015 and was a resident of Punjab’s Mansa area.Mirwaiz, Malik arrestedSeparatist leaders, including Syed Ali Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Yasin Malik, addressed a small rally in Srinagar on Wednesday. They called for a shutdown on November 27 against the National Investigation Agency (NIA) raids and ongoing “crackdown of civilian population” during counter-insurgency operations in the Valley.The Mirwaiz and Mr. Malik, along with 30 supporters, were arrested when they tried to lead a protest march towards the city centre Lal Chowk.Earlier, Mr. Geelani addressed a rally on the phone. The Mirwaiz and Mr. Malik were present at Abi Guzar to jointly address the media. “This puppet government has crossed all limits of oppression. If they thinks they can break our resolve and unity, they are mistaken. We are not going to surrender under any circumstance,” said Mr. Malik. ‘Fabricated cases’He alleged that NIA raids and the security agencies’ operation against civilian population in south and north Kashmir “is aimed at forcing us to surrender.” The trio said the shutdown on November 27 was also against the “maltreatment of detainees and the fabricated cases being slapped on leaders and supporters.” For many months now, separatists in Kashmir have been barred from holding public rallies.last_img read more


LA would support a US Winter Games, but it’s complicated


first_img2 dead in California school attack; gunman shoots self PLAY LIST 03:122 dead in California school attack; gunman shoots self02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. It’s also the story of Utah, which might get in the mix to host a Winter Olympics in 2026 or 2030.The chairman of the LA bid was in Park City on Tuesday for the U.S. Olympic Committee media summit to discuss Los Angeles’ recent victory; many of the questions he fielded, though, involved whether a U.S. bid for an upcoming Winter Games might make sense, too.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Twenty-six is complicated, obviously,” Casey Wasserman said. “Obviously, there are real challenges from a timing perspective, two years before us. But I think our approach has been, the Olympic Games, whether summer or winter, are good for American athletes. Our intent is to be a good partner to the USOC and American athletes.”The USOC board will meet next month to discuss the possibility. The same country hasn’t hosted back-to-back Olympics since before World War II, though when the International Olympic Committee scrapped its traditional rules and awarded 2024 (Paris) and 2028 (LA) at the same time, it indicated it was certainly open to new ideas. Salt Lake City hosted the Winter Olympics in 2002, and what remains there and in Park City pretty much adheres to Agenda 2020, the blueprint that IOC President Thomas Bach set for future Olympics, which calls for less spending on new venues and infrastructure.Through a legacy foundation, the area has maintained an Olympic speedskating oval and a Nordic skiing course, each of which have drawn local athletes to their respective sports and could be used as part of an upcoming bid. The Utah Olympic Park remains an active training ground for action sports, for both U.S. athletes and those from other countries who are invited to work out there.Meanwhile, Utah likes the Olympics: NBC says Salt Lake City has ranked as either No. 1 or 2 among U.S. TV markets over the last three Winter Games.Leaders of the movement to bring the games back to Utah have largely stayed quiet, not wanting to take the limelight from Los Angeles, which helped the U.S. put a stop to a long string of embarrassing losses on the Olympic bid front. But a handful have told The Associated Press that there is enthusiasm for a potential bid if the USOC will sign on.“There’s fantastic momentum to have the Games come back. I think we could do it for a very affordable price compared to the rest of the world,” said Ted Morris, the executive director of U.S. Speedskating, which is based in the Salt Lake City area. “In my opinion, looking at ’26 is probably not realistic, but ’30 seems like an opportunity.”ADVERTISEMENT Read Next LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  The most complicating factor for either year would be a reworking of an agreement between LA and the USOC that transfers the USOC’s marketing rights to the city’s organizing committee over an eight-year span. Adding another American Olympics to that mix would force some major renegotiations.There’s also the issue of the IOC bid process. Bach has redrawn the rules for 2026, creating friendlier deadlines for cities to commit to a bid. But he has not committed to a potential double award for 2026 and 2030, the way he did with 2024 and 2028.Also, the USOC will have to consider Denver and Reno, Nevada, which also have expressed interest in hosting a Winter Games but would be behind the curve compared with Salt Lake City.“Thomas Bach has publicly stated he’d like to see the Winter Games return to a more traditional location, and to me, that’s code for Europe or North America,” said USOC chairman Larry Probst, speaking to the fact that the hosts for 2014, 2018 and 2022 are Russia, South Korea and China. “We’ve got to look at that, then develop a strategy about whether we’re going to bid for the (2026) Winter Games or beyond that.” MOST READ FILE – In this Feb. 9, 2002, file photo, Georg Hackl, of Germany, speeds past an Olympic logo during a practice run for the men’s singles luge at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics in Park City, Utah. The idea of the U.S. hosting a Winter Olympics is complicated. So says the leader of the team that brought the Summer Games to Los Angeles for 2028. LA 2028 chairman Casey Wasserman says his team would be supportive of a bid to bring the Winter Games to the United States. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)PARK CITY, Utah — The venues are there. The city loves the Olympics. The memories of the last games it hosted are still fairly fresh and mostly positive.This is the story of Los Angeles, which will host the Summer Games in 2028.ADVERTISEMENT Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Playoff-bound Cubs lose to Reds in finale BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more


Saguisag appeals for ‘trouble-free’ Game 2


first_imgCayetano: 4 social media groups behind SEA Games ‘sabotage’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Read Next Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City LATEST STORIES Saguisag is imploring both sides to have a “trouble-free” Game 2.“I’m appealing to all parties, and that includes coaches, spectators, athletic directors,  and the like for a trouble-free Game 2,” he said.Ateneo shoots for a sweep on Wednesday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion View comments Ateneo guard Matt Nieto is down on the floor after taking an inadvertent elbow from La Salle big man Ben Mbala late in the first half of Game 1 of the UAAP Season 80 mens basketball Finals. Nieto sustained a cut above his left eye. Photo by Bong Lozada/INQUIRER.netUAAP executive director Rebo Saguisag will be laying down the law before Ateneo and La Salle take the court again Wednesday with the UAAP Season 80 title duel getting has heated as ever.Saguisag is looking to summon select players from both teams on Wednesday following videos of unsportsmanlike acts surfaced online.ADVERTISEMENT Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA UAAP finds no referee bias in controversial La Salle-Adamson game “We’re still reviewing the videos,” Saguisag said in a text message.Saguisag did not divulge the names of the players, but videos have circulated online over the past days that saw La Salle players doing unsportsmanlike acts through the course of Game 1.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutOne video shows La Salle’s Abu Tratter seemingly hitting Ateneo’s Raffy Verano with a punch in a rebound play, while another shows young Archer Ricci Rivero giving a cheap shot to Vince Tolentino after the Blue Eagle attempted a free throw.The physicality in the championship series opener also saw Ben Mbala inadvertently elbow Matt Nieto in the face that left the Ateneo bloodied after sustaining a cut over his left eye. MOST READ QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohortlast_img read more


10 months agoLiverpool goalkeeper Alisson: Why Klopp so special


first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool goalkeeper Alisson: Why Klopp so specialby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool goalkeeper Alisson admits he loves playing for manager Jurgen Klopp.The 26-year-old has been full of praise for his new boss Klopp, who he has labelled as one of the best in the world.“His passion for football, for winning, for doing the right thing,” he said.“He does the best for the club and the players. Not just the players but all the staff, everyone involved in the football club.“He has this passion that he transmits to us that we then take on the field.”I believe that is the most important [characteristic] — that and his intelligence.” last_img


10 months ago​Tottenham star Alli avoids FA punishment for Arsenal gesture


first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say ​Tottenham star Alli avoids FA punishment for Arsenal gestureby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham star Dele Alli will not be punished for a sign he made to Arsenal supporters during his side’s Carabao Cup win last night.Alli netted the second goal of the game and made a gesture to remind the fans of the score.While his gesture could be seen as inflammatory, it was not abusive, which means he will be cut some slack.Sky Sports suggests that no further action will be taken.And the Gunners will not face any action after a supporter was caught on video throwing something at Alli. But that supporter does face criminal action and a stadium ban. last_img


Ashley Judd Says She Will Be Pressing Charges On Fans Who Sexually Harassed Her On Twitter


first_imgAshley Judd speaks on TV.Sunday, Kentucky superfan Ashley Judd, who was clearly emotional during what was a rough SEC Tournament title game, tweeted during the second half that the Arkansas Razorbacks were playing “dirty” against her Wildcats. Unfortunately, in response, Judd claims she was both called inappropriate names and threatened with sexual violence by a number of users. She tweeted her frustration afterwards, and showed her followers an example.Monday, Judd, who has written in her memoirs about being a sexual abuse survivor, told MSNBC that she’ll be pressing charges on the users who sent her the tweets. She joined Thomas Roberts to talk about Kentucky’s chances in the NCAA Tournament and eventually got to the topic of social media. Start the video around 4:35 if you’re just looking for that portion.Judd made no mention of how many Twitter users she’d be pressing charges against. Hopefully this makes people think twice before tweeting offensive messages at celebrities – or anyone else.last_img read more